American Time Use Survey Summary

For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Wednesday, June 18, 2014                          USDL-14-1137

Technical information: (202) 691-6339  •  atusinfo@bls.gov  •  www.bls.gov/tus
Media contact:         (202) 691-5902  •  PressOffice@bls.gov


                              AMERICAN TIME USE SURVEY -- 2013 RESULTS


On an average day in 2013, employed adults living in households with no children under
age 18 engaged in leisure activities for 4.5 hours, about an hour more than employed
adults living with a child under age 6, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported
today. Nearly everyone age 15 and over (95 percent) engaged in some sort of leisure
activity, such as watching TV, socializing, or exercising. 

These and other results from the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) were released today.
These data include the average amount of time per day in 2013 that individuals worked,
did household activities, and engaged in leisure and sports activities. Additionally,
measures of the average time per day spent providing childcare--both as a primary (or
main) activity and while doing other things--for the combined years 2009-13 are provided.
For a further description of ATUS data and methodology, see the Technical Note.

Working (by Employed Persons) in 2013

  --Employed persons worked an average of 7.6 hours on the days they worked. More hours
    were worked, on average, on weekdays than on weekend days--7.9 hours compared with
    5.5 hours. (See table 4.)

  --On the days they worked, employed men worked 53 minutes more than employed women.
    This difference partly reflects women's greater likelihood of working part time.
    However, even among full-time workers (those usually working 35 hours or more per
    week), men worked longer than women--8.3 hours compared with 7.7 hours. (See
    table 4.)

  --Many more people worked on weekdays than on weekend days: 83 percent of employed
    persons worked on an average weekday, compared with 34 percent on an average
    weekend day. (See table 4.) 

  --On the days they worked, 83 percent of employed persons did some or all of their
    work at their workplace and 23 percent did some or all of their work at home.
    They spent more time working at the workplace than at home--7.9 hours compared
    with 3.0 hours. (See table 6.)

  --Multiple jobholders were more likely to work on an average day than were single
    jobholders--77 percent compared with 67 percent. (For a definition of average
    day, see the Technical Note.) Multiple jobholders also were more likely to work
    at home than were single jobholders--31 percent compared with 22 percent. (See
    table 6.)

  --Self-employed workers were nearly three times more likely than wage and salary
    workers to have done some work at home on days worked--56 percent compared with
    20 percent. Self-employed workers also were more likely to work on weekend days
    than were wage and salary workers--43 percent compared with 31 percent. (See
    tables 5 and 7.)

  --On the days they worked, 36 percent of employed people age 25 and over with a
    bachelor's degree or higher did some work at home, compared with only 7 percent
    of those with less than a high school diploma. (See table 6.)

Household Activities in 2013

  --On an average day, 83 percent of women and 65 percent of men spent some time
    doing household activities such as housework, cooking, lawn care, or financial
    and other household management. (See table 1.)

  --On the days they did household activities, women spent an average of 2.6 hours
    on such activities, while men spent 2.1 hours. (See table 1.)

  --On an average day, 19 percent of men did housework--such as cleaning or doing
    laundry--compared with 49 percent of women. Forty-two percent of men did food
    preparation or cleanup, compared with 68 percent of women. (See table 1.)

Leisure Activities in 2013

  --On an average day, nearly everyone age 15 and over (95 percent) engaged in some
    sort of leisure activity, such as watching TV, socializing, or exercising. Of
    those who engaged in leisure activities, men spent more time in these activities
    (5.9 hours) than did women (5.2 hours). (See table 1.)

  --Watching TV was the leisure activity that occupied the most time (2.8 hours
    per day), accounting for more than half of leisure time, on average, for those
    age 15 and over. Socializing, such as visiting with friends or attending or
    hosting social events, was the next most common leisure activity, accounting
    for 43 minutes per day. (See table 1.)

  --Men were more likely than women to participate in sports, exercise, or recreation
    on any given day--21 percent compared with 16 percent. On the days that they
    participated, men also spent more time in these activities than did women--1.9
    hours compared with 1.3 hours. (See table 1.)

  --On an average day, adults age 75 and over spent 7.5 hours engaged in leisure
    activities--more than any other age group; 25- to 34-year-olds spent 4.3
    hours and 35- to 44-year-olds spent 4.1 hours engaged in leisure and sports
    activities--less than other age groups. (See table 11.)

  --Time spent reading for personal interest and playing games or using a computer
    for leisure varied greatly by age. Individuals age 75 and over averaged 1.0 hour
    of reading per weekend day and 20 minutes playing games or using a computer for
    leisure. Conversely, individuals ages 15 to 19 read for an average of 4 minutes
    per weekend day and spent 52 minutes playing games or using a computer for
    leisure. (See table 11.)

  --Employed adults living in households with no children under age 18 engaged in
    leisure activities for 4.5 hours per day, about an hour more than employed
    adults living with a child under age 6. (See table 8.)

Care of Household Children for the period 2009-13

  --Adults living in households with children under age 6 spent an average of
    2.0 hours per day providing primary childcare to household children. Adults
    living in households where the youngest child was between the ages of 6 and
    17 spent less than half as much time providing primary childcare to household
    children--47 minutes per day. Primary childcare is childcare that is done as
    a main activity, such as physical care of children and reading to or talking
    with children. (See table 9.)

  --On an average day, among adults living in households with children under age 6,
    women spent 1.0 hour providing physical care (such as bathing or feeding a child)
    to household children; by contrast, men spent 26 minutes providing physical care.
    (See table 9.)

  --Adults living in households with at least one child under age 6 spent an average
    of 5.4 hours per day providing secondary childcare--that is, they had at least
    one child in their care while doing activities other than primary childcare.
    Secondary childcare provided by adults living in households with children under
    age 6 was most commonly provided while doing leisure activities (2.1 hours) or
    household activities (1.3 hours). (See table 10.)

  --Adults living in households with children under age 6 spent more time providing
    primary childcare on an average weekday (2.1 hours) than on an average weekend
    day (1.8 hours). However, they spent less time providing secondary childcare
    on weekdays than on weekend days--4.5 hours compared with 7.4 hours. (See
    tables 9 and 10.)

Additional Data 

ATUS 2013 data files are available for users to do their own tabulations and analyses.
In accordance with BLS and Census Bureau policies that protect survey respondents'
privacy, identifying information was removed from the data files. The 2013 data files
are available on the BLS website at www.bls.gov/tus/data.htm.


   ____________________________________________________________________________________
  |                                                                                    |
  |                        Partial Federal Government Shutdown                         |
  |                                                                                    |
  |Some agencies of the federal government--including the Bureau of Labor Statistics-- |
  |were shut down or operating at reduced staffing levels from October 1, 2013, through|
  |October 16, 2013.                                                                   |
  |                                                                                    |
  |All American Time Use Survey (ATUS) operations were suspended from October 1 through|
  |October 16. No call attempts were made and no interviews were completed during the  |
  |shutdown. Because ATUS interviews are conducted every day and collect time diaries  |
  |about “yesterday”--that is, the day prior to the interview day--there are no ATUS   |
  |data for September 30 through October 15. Data collection resumed on October 17.    |
  |                                                                                    |
  |The shutdown primarily affected ATUS data for the fourth quarter of 2013, as nearly |
  |all of the missing time diaries were in this period. ATUS estimates included in this|
  |news release have been weighted such that the time diaries for October 16 through   |
  |December 30 represent all days in the quarter, including those missing because of   |
  |the shutdown. For information on the ATUS weights, please see the Technical Note.   |
  |										       |
  |It is possible that ATUS estimates for 2013 or for the fourth quarter of 2013 could |
  |have been affected by the loss of data due to the shutdown. If people's time use in |
  |early October 2013 differed from their time use in the remainder of the year, ATUS  |
  |estimates would fail to account for this difference. For example, people who were   |
  |affected by the shutdown may have modified how they spent their time, but the       |
  |estimates would not capture this. Any seasonal differences in activities between    |
  |these periods could also affect the estimates, although ATUS data historically have |
  |exhibited minimal seasonality. It is not possible to quantify the effect of the     |
  |shutdown on the ATUS estimates.                                                     |
  |                                                                                    |
  |Additional information is available at www.bls.gov/tus/october2013shutdown.htm.    |
  |____________________________________________________________________________________|



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Last Modified Date: June 18, 2014