Article

September 2013

Green Goods and Services survey: results and collection

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Government

The public sector had 886,080 green goods and services jobs in 2011, or 4.2 percent of public sector employment. Over the year, government green goods and services employment decreased by 14,890 (–1.7 percent). In 2011, local government had the most green goods and services employment in the public sector, 424,201, representing 3.1 percent of total local government employment.

Within local government, the transportation and warehousing sector, which encompasses mass transit systems, had the largest green goods and services employment in local government with 209,063 jobs. The most significant change in green goods and services employment in local government occurred in the utilities sector, which lost 5,346 green goods and services jobs (–5.4 percent) over the year. Utilities within local government also sustained a significant decrease in the green goods and services employment rate, which decreased from 40.8 percent to 38.9 percent over the year.

Following an over-the-year loss of 7,685 green goods and services jobs, state government had 248,539 green goods and services jobs in 2011, accounting for 5.5 percent of state government employment. Public administration had the largest number of green goods and services jobs in state government, 164,952 (9 percent). This industry includes the enforcement of environmental regulations and the administration of environmental programs. The most significant change within state government occurred in the professional, scientific, and technical services sector, which includes engineering services. This sector lost 950 green goods and services jobs between 2010 and 2011. The green goods and services employment rate in the professional, scientific, and technical services industry decreased from 9 percent to 4 percent in the same period.

The federal government had 213,340 green goods and services jobs representing 7.5 percent of its total employment in 2011. As was the case with state government, most green goods and services jobs in the federal government were in the public administration sector, which had 139,884 green goods and services jobs in 2011. The professional, scientific, and technical services sector had the second largest green goods and services employment in federal government with 39,714 jobs. The most statistically significant change in green goods and services employment within the federal government, however, occurred in the utilities sector, which decreased by 713 green goods and services jobs.

Geographic detail

Ten states had more than 100,000 green goods and services jobs in 2011: California (360,245), New York (266,308), Texas (227,532), Pennsylvania (167,397), Ohio (137,143), Illinois (136,447), Florida (117,433), North Carolina (108,094), Virginia (107,773), and Washington (101,593).

California had the highest green goods and services employment in the United States, representing 2.5 percent of the state’s total employment. Construction had the largest number of private sector green goods and services jobs in California, 54,070, representing 9.7 percent of total green goods and services employment in the state. Construction also had the most green goods and services employment growth, with 16,890 green goods and services jobs added over the year. Administrative and waste services (50,022); professional, scientific, and technical services (43,279); and manufacturing (36,417) were the next industry sectors with the most green goods and services jobs. Utilities had the most significant green goods and services employment rate growth, from 8.0 percent in 2010 to 13.6 percent in 2011, the highest green goods and services employment rate within the state’s private sector.

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About the Author

Amanda L. Chadwick
chadwick.amanda@bls.gov

Amanda L. Chadwick, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, is a program analyst in the Office of Administration, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Mark DeWolf

Mark DeWolf, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, is a financial economist with the Bureau of the Fiscal Service, U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Nicholas A. Fett
fett.nicholas@bls.gov

Nicholas A. Fett is an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Robert L. Viegas
viegas.robert@bls.gov

Robert L. Viegas, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, is a program analyst in the Office of Field Operations, Bureau of Labor Statistics.