Article

September 2013

Green Goods and Services survey: results and collection

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New York had the second most green goods and services jobs in the nation, representing 3.2 percent of the state’s total employment in 2011. In New York’s private sector, the transportation and warehousing industry had the most green goods and services jobs (38,670), followed by construction (30,657); professional, scientific, and technical services (21,830); and manufacturing (21,719). Construction had the most significant increase in green goods and services employment, growing by 15,828 over the year. This growth led the construction sector to have the highest increase in green goods and services employment rates among all private industry sectors in New York, growing from 4.9 to 10.0 percent.

Texas had the third largest green goods and services employment in the United States in 2011, with 2.2 percent of the state’s total employment being green goods and services jobs. Construction had the largest number of private sector green goods and services jobs in the state (46,559); followed by professional, scientific, and technical services (33,558); and manufacturing (27,554). Neither green goods and services employment nor green goods and services employment rate changed significantly in Texas between 2010 and 2011 for these sectors.

The District of Columbia had the highest percentage of green goods and services total employment of any jurisdiction measured, 5.1 percent, in 2011. Oregon had the next highest proportion of its employment in green goods and services jobs, 4.3 percent. California experienced the largest increase in green goods and services employment, with an additional 17,366 green goods and services jobs over the year. Maryland had the second largest increase in green goods and services employment, with 14,143 green goods and services jobs added between 2010 and 2011.

Data collection

Data collection for the 2010 GGS survey began in May 2011, with the mailing of advance notification letters to sampled establishments informing them that they were selected to participate in the GGS survey. The first mailing of GGS survey forms commenced 2 weeks later, followed by a second form mailed to nonrespondents 6 weeks after the initial survey forms were mailed. A third and final form was mailed to select nonrespondents 12 weeks after the initial mailing. At the same time the third forms were mailed, BLS initiated the nonresponse prompting (NRP) process, which consisted of computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) calls to nonrespondents. The NRP process occurred for 5 months, from July 2011 through November 2011. Edit reconciliation telephone calls commenced in November 2011 for units that BLS identified as needing additional review because of quality concerns, such as logic failures, unreadable data, or outlier responses. All data collection and reconciliation processes ended January 2012, and the final response rate for the 2010 GGS survey was 70.6 percent.

Data collection for the 2011 GGS survey began April 2012. This collection included the addition of an online data collection tool, which allowed respondents to answer the survey via Internet. The 2011 survey had 9,853 (11.1 percent) respondents submit responses online. A full breakdown of collection method by survey year can be seen in figure 4.

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About the Author

Amanda L. Chadwick
chadwick.amanda@bls.gov

Amanda L. Chadwick, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, is a program analyst in the Office of Administration, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Mark DeWolf

Mark DeWolf, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, is a financial economist with the Bureau of the Fiscal Service, U.S. Department of the Treasury.

Nicholas A. Fett
fett.nicholas@bls.gov

Nicholas A. Fett is an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Robert L. Viegas
viegas.robert@bls.gov

Robert L. Viegas, formerly an economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, is a program analyst in the Office of Field Operations, Bureau of Labor Statistics.