Article

May 2013

Implementing the 2010 Standard Occupational Classification in the Occupational Employment Statistics

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The St. Mary’s County, MD, nonmetropolitan area had the highest concentration of information security analysts of any local area, with a location quotient of over 11 for this occupation. Local areas with the highest concentrations of this occupation also included Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV; Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, AR-MO; and the Northern Virginia nonmetropolitan area.

Information security analysts earned an average of $89,290 annually, nearly $44,000 above the U.S. all-occupations mean. The industry with the highest employment of information security analysts, computer systems design and related services, also had a slightly above-average wage of $91,880 for this occupation. Among areas employing at least 500 information security analysts, the highest paying included the New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ, metropolitan division ($117,860); the San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, CA, metropolitan division ($115,660); and the Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick, MD, metropolitan division ($111,010).

Employment patterns for the two remaining new computer occupations (computer network architects and computer network support specialists) were similar to one another, perhaps reflecting the relationship between these occupations’ duties. Computer network architects design and implement computer and information networks, such as local area networks (or LANs) and Intranets, while computer network support specialists focus on analyzing, testing, and maintaining existing networks. The computer network support specialists occupation was the largest of the four new computer occupations, with May 2012 employment of 167,980; employment of computer network architects was about 137,890. As with the other new computer occupations, computer systems design and related services had the highest employment of both computer network architects and computer network support specialists, with 28 percent and 21 percent of total employment in these occupations, respectively. Wired telecommunications carriers and management of companies and enterprises were the industries with the second- and third-highest employment of both of these computer occupations.

The Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV, and Olympia, WA, metropolitan areas had among the highest employment concentrations of both new computer network occupations. Other areas with the highest employment concentrations of computer network architects included Tallahassee, FL; Gainesville, FL; and Durham-Chapel Hill, NC. The Madison, WI; Boulder, CO; and Raleigh-Cary, NC, metropolitan areas had among the highest concentrations of computer network support specialists. The Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV, and New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ, metropolitan divisions had among the highest employment of both computer network architects and computer network support specialists, although unlike the Washington, DC, metropolitan area, New York-White Plains-Wayne did not have an above-average concentration of either occupation.

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About the Author

Audrey L. Watson
Watson.Audrey@bls.gov

Audrey L. Watson is an economist in the Division of Occupational Employment Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics.