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Spring 2001 Vol. 45, Number 1

Computer support specialists

—NUTSHELL:
Theyíre technical troubleshooters, and their numbers are increasing. Thatís good news for distressed computer users.


—SNIPPET:
Almost every computer user encounters a problem occasionally, whether itís the disaster of a crashing hard drive or the annoyance of a forgotten password. Some people try to solve the problem on their own. Others seek the aid of workers trained to resolve technical emergencies, predicaments, and glitches. These workers are known as computer support specialists. 

There were more than 400,000 computer support specialists working in the United States in 1998. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the occupation is projected to be one of the fastest growing over the next decadeómore than doubling in employment between 1998 and 2008. 

These jobs will be filled by both newly trained and existing computer support specialists who continue to keep their skills current. This article describes what computer support specialists do, what their employment outlook is, how much they earn, and what training they need.

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U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Last Updated: June 27, 2001