Accessibility information 
OOQ Logo OOQ Online banner


Home

About OOQ Online
Index
archive
Feedback

Occupational Outlook Handbook Home
Career guide to Industries Home
Employment Projections Home
MLR: The Editor's Desk
OES Occupational Profiles
BLS Home

Winter 2002-03 Vol. 46, Number 4

Associate degree: Two years to a career or a jump start to a bachelorís degree

—NUTSHELL:
Associate degrees continue to open doors for millions of Americans in search of careers or advanced academic study. Here are some of the options.


—SNIPPET:

In 2 years, you can train for some of the fastest growing jobs in the economy, increase your earnings, and pave the way for further education. 

How? Earn an associate degree. An associate degree is a college degree awarded after the completion of about 20 classes. It either prepares students for a career following graduation or allows them to transfer into a bachelorís degree program.

Compared with workers whose highest level of educational attainment was a high school diploma, workers with an associate degree averaged an extra $128 a week in 2001, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). People with associate degrees also are more likely to find jobs: the unemployment rate in 2001 was more than 30 percent lower for associate degree holders compared with high school graduates. And, according to several academic studies, advantages in the job market might be even greater for those just starting their careers and for those who work in a career related to their degree.

How to best view PDF files Download the PDF (233K)

 

 

U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Last Updated: May 22, 2003