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Fall 2003 Vol. 47, Number 3

Average weekly earnings by size of establishment, 2002 first quarter

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Average weekly earnings by size of establishment, 2002 first quarter 

To earn more, think big. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages program show that, generally, the larger the establishment in which people worked, the more they were paid. One exception was for the smallest establishments, where workers earned somewhat more per week than did those in some slightly larger establishments. This stems, in part, from higher earnings in small establishments in the wholesale trade, information, and arts, entertainment, and recreation industries.

As the chart illustrates, workers employed in the largest class of establishments averaged $450 to $500 more per week than did those employed in the smallest. But small establishments—those with fewer than 100 employees—outnumber large ones. An establishment is defined as an institution that produces goods or services, usually in a single physical location, such as a factory or a store.

The data are from January to March 2002 and cover 98 percent of all U.S. jobs: those that fall under unemployment-insurance laws. For more information, contact the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) Program, 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE., Room 4840, Washington, DC 20212-0001; (202) 691-6567; www.bls.gov/cew.

 

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U.S. Department of Labor
Bureau of Labor Statistics

Last Updated: February 27, 2004