Physicians work the longest weeks

December 23, 1998

In 1997, about 30 percent of men and 15 percent of women usually worked more than 44 hours per week. Among men, those working as physicians or as clergy had the longest workweeks at an average of 52 hours. Among women, those working as physicians had the longest workweeks at 49 hours.

Usual weekly hours by sex and occupation, 1997
[Chart data—TXT]

Among male physicians, 32 percent worked between 35 and 44 hours per week; 25 percent worked between 45 and 54 hours per week; and 44 percent between 55 and 99 hours per week. Among female physicians, 45 percent worked between 35 and 44 hours per week; 24 percent between 45 and 54 hours per week; and 32 percent were on the job between 55 and 99 hours per week.

Other occupations where males averaged 50 or more hours worked per week were extractive occupations, farmworkers, firefighting occupations, and managers of food serving and lodging establishments.

Other occupations where females averaged 45 or more hours worked per week were lawyers, teachers at colleges and universities, managers of marketing, advertising, and public relations companies, and managers of food serving and lodging establishments.

These data are a product of the Current Population Survey. More information may be obtained from "How hours of work affect occupational earnings", Monthly Labor Review, October 1998.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Physicians work the longest weeks on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/1998/dec/wk4/art03.htm (visited July 23, 2014).

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