Days away from work, job transfer, or restriction due to injuries and illnesses, 2003

January 03, 2005

In 2003, approximately 2.3 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses required recuperation away from work, transfer to another job, restricted duties at work, or a combination of these actions.

Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and case types, 2003
[Chart data—TXT]

For all private industry, the total rate for such days-away-from work, job-transfer, or restriction cases was 2.6 per 100 workers; separately, the rate for cases with days away from work was 1.5, and the rate for cases with job transfer or restriction was 1.1.

The total rate in manufacturing was 3.8. Separately, the rate for days-away-from-work cases was 1.6, and the rate for cases with job transfer or restriction was 2.2.

In all other industry sectors shown in the chart, the rate for days-away-from-work cases was higher than the rate for cases with job transfer or restriction. For example, in construction, with a total rate of 3.6, the rate for days-away-from-work cases was 2.6, and the rate for cases with job transfer or restriction was 1.0.

These data come from the Injuries, Illnesses, and Fatalities program. See "Workplace Injuries and Illnesses in 2003" (PDF) (TXT), news release USDL 04-2486, for more information.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Days away from work, job transfer, or restriction due to injuries and illnesses, 2003 on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2005/jan/wk1/art01.htm (visited September 02, 2014).

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