Bureau of Labor Statistics

Projections of industry employment, 2014–24

December 2015

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Knowing which industries are projected to grow or decline helps jobseekers make more informed career decisions. The charts in this article show employment change in particular industries between 2014 and 2024 as projected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of goods produced or service provided by the business for which they work. For example, all workers in a school are part of the educational services industry, regardless of their specific job duties. The educational services industry includes teachers and other workers—such as office managers and janitors—who have administrative tasks or a support role.

The charts also show projections by major industry sector and detailed industry. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total number of jobs) and percent change (the rate of job growth or decline) over the 2014–24 decade. The average growth rate of 7 percent for all wage and salary workers is shown as a dotted vertical line in charts 1 and 3.  

In most of the charts, industries are categorized into one of two groups: providing services or producing goods. Service-providing industries are projected to account for the most job growth between 2014 and 2024, adding about 9.3 million jobs. In goods-producing industries, employment is projected to decline slightly, with a loss of 20,000 jobs over the decade. 

(For more information on how we develop the projections, read about our methodology.)

Growth by major industry sector

To illustrate general employment trends, these charts show employment growth in broad groups of similar industries. Industries shown in the charts are defined primarily according to the 2012 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), which the federal government uses to sort establishments into industry categories.

The healthcare and social assistance sector is projected to have the fastest job growth. (See chart 1.)

View Chart Data

Chart 1: Growth by major industry sector

Percent change in employment of wage and salary workers, projected 2014–24
Major industry sector Percent change in employment

Health care and social assistance

21%

Construction

13%

Educational services, private

10%

Professional and business services

10%

Mining

10%

Leisure and hospitality

6%

Financial activities

6%

Wholesale trade

6%

Retail trade

5%

Other services

4%

State and local government

4%

Transportation and warehousing

3%

Information

-1%

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting

-6%

Manufacturing

-7%

Utilities

-9%

Federal government

-14%

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Together, the healthcare and social assistance and the professional and business services sectors are projected to add more jobs than all other sectors combined. (See chart 2.)

View Chart Data

Chart 2: New jobs by major industry sector

Numeric change in employment of wage and salary workers, projected 2014–24
Major industry sector Numeric change in employment

Health care and social assistance

3,794,800

Professional and business services

1,889,300

Leisure and hospitality

941,200

Construction

790,400

Retail trade

764,600

State and local government

756,100

Financial activities

507,200

Educational services, private

338,700

Wholesale trade

325,400

Other services

268,000

Transportation and warehousing

136,600

Mining

80,200

Information

-27,100

Utilities

-47,900

Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting

-76,700

Federal government

-383,400

Manufacturing

-814,100

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Growth by detailed industry

BLS projects employment for 206 detailed industries. Those projected to have the most growth or decline are highlighted in these charts. Some industries with fast rates of growth have a relatively small number of workers, as is the case for those that provide financial services such as establishing funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles. These small, fast-growing industries may not offer as many new jobs as some larger industries that are projected to grow more slowly, such as state and local government.

As chart 3 shows, the fastest growing industries are projected to be concentrated in those that provide services.

View Chart Data

Chart 3: Fastest growing industries

Percent growth in employment of wage and salary workers by detailed industry, projected 2014–24
Industry Employment growth

Home health care services

60%

Outpatient care centers

49%

Offices of other health practitioners

45%

Other ambulatory health care services

40%

Medical and diagnostic laboratories

32%

Management, scientific, and technical consulting services

26%

Software publishers

26%

Facilities support services

24%

Computer systems design and related services

23%

Nursing and residential care facilities

23%

Securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments and related activities

22%

Offices of physicians

21%

Offices of dentists

18%

Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles

17%

Local government passenger transit

16%

Other information services

15%

Office administrative services

15%

Support activities for mining

14%

Individual and family services

14%

Wireless telecommunications carriers (except satellite)

14%

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.


The construction industry is expected to gain the most jobs. (See chart 4.) Employment in this sector still has not fully rebounded from the loss of jobs during the last recession.

View Chart Data

Chart 4: Industries with the most new jobs

Numeric growth in employment of wage and salary workers by detailed industry, projected 2014–24
Industry Employment change

Construction

790,400

Home health care services

760,400

Nursing and residential care facilities

735,700

Food services and drinking places

658,000

Offices of physicians

522,700

Local government educational services compensation

426,400

Employment services

424,800

Computer systems design and related services

408,900

Hospitals

394,900

Offices of other health practitioners

352,300

Outpatient care centers

348,100

Management, scientific, and technical consulting services

329,300

Wholesale trade

325,400

Individual and family services

286,300

General merchandise stores

263,200

Retail, except motor vehicle and parts dealers, food and beverage stores, and general merchandise stores

251,000

Junior colleges, colleges, universities, and professional schools, private

220,000

Securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments and related activities

196,600

Offices of dentists

159,800

Motor vehicle and parts dealers

155,900

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.


Of the industries projected to lose the most jobs, more than half are in the manufacturing sector. (See chart 5.)

View Chart Data

Chart 5: Industries with the most job losses

Numeric decline in employment of wage and salary workers by detailed industry, projected 2014–24
Industry Employment change

Postal Service

-165,100

Federal non-defense government compensation

-110,500

Newspaper, periodical, book, and directory publishers

-103,300

Wired telecommunications carriers

-97,800

Federal defense government compensation

-82,200

Printing and related support activities

-81,400

Apparel, leather, and allied manufacturing

-76,800

Crop production

-65,700

Plastics product manufacturing

-63,100

Textile mills and textile product mills

-57,900

Other miscellaneous manufacturing

-55,900

Electric power generation, transmission and distribution

-40,800

Navigational, measuring, electromedical, and control instruments manufacturing

-35,200

Semiconductor and other electronic component manufacturing

-35,100

Computer and peripheral equipment manufacturing

-27,300

Travel arrangement and reservation services

-26,800

Aerospace product and parts manufacturing

-24,300

Communications equipment manufacturing

-24,000

Motor vehicle parts manufacturing

-22,600

Federal enterprises except the Postal Service and electric utilities

-22,200

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Telephone: 1-202-691-5700 www.bls.gov/careeroutlook Contact Career Outlook

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