Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data on display icon

Data on display
Projected new jobs by major industry sector, 2016–26

| December 2017

Service-providing industries are projected to account for most of the job growth in the economy between 2016 and 2026, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). In fact, of the 11.5 million new jobs BLS projects over the decade, about 10.5 million—more than 90 percent—will be in service-providing industries.

As the chart shows, the health care and social assistance sector is projected to add many more nonagricultural jobs than other sectors will over the 2016–26 decade. More than half of that growth is expected to be in the ambulatory health care services industry. (For highlights of industry employment change within each sector, click on the bars of sectors that are in boldface type.)

View Chart Data

Numeric change in employment of nonagricultural wage and salary workers, by major industry sector, projected 2016–26
Major sector and industry Employment change, projected 2016-26

Health care and social assistance

3,998,300

Ambulatory health care services

2,197,700

Social assistance

952,500

Nursing and residential care facilities

429,100

Hospitals

419,000

Professional and business services

2,159,700

Professional, scientific, and technical services

1,179,300

Administrative and support services

783,200

Management of companies and enterprises

137,500

Waste management and remediation services

59,800

Leisure and hospitality

1,319,000

Food services and drinking places

1,077,000

Amusement, gambling, and recreation industries

142,600

Accommodation

43,100

Performing arts, spectator sports, and related industries

30,100

Construction

864,700

State and local government

788,700

Local government educational services compensation

413,100

State government educational services compensation

125,400

Local government, other compensation

124,600

Local government enterprises except passenger transit

87,700

Educational services

506,500

Financial activities

479,800

Insurance carriers and related activities

166,600

Real estate

111,000

Securities, commodity contracts, fund, trusts and other financial investments and vehicles and related activities

101,200

Monetary authorities, credit intermediation, and related activities

86,600

Retail trade

412,300

Motor vehicle and parts dealers

163,900

Retail , except motor vehicle and parts dealers, food and beverage stores, and general merchandise stores

130,900

General merchandise stores

87,100

Food and beverage stores

30,300

Transportation and warehousing

364,300

Warehousing and storage

195,700

Scenic and sightseeing transportation and support activities for transportation

71,000

Truck transportation

40,400

Couriers and messengers

34,200

Other services

352,000

Personal and laundry services

160,700

Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations

106,200

Repair and maintenance

87,500

Private households

-2,400

Wholesale trade

145,800

Mining

90,800

Support activities for mining

69,300

Oil and gas extraction

34,000

Mining, except oil and gas

-12,500

Information

52,500

Other information services

125,400

Motion picture, video, and sound recording industries

49,600

Data processing, hosting, and related services

39,600

Publishing industries (except internet)

-18,100

Utilities

3,400

Federal government

-55,800

Manufacturing

-736,400

Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing

7,900

Petroleum and coal products manufacturing

-3,200

Furniture and related product manufacturing

-8,700

Wood product manufacturing

-12,300

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

Industry sectors, and the industries that make up the sectors, are defined according to the 2012 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). The federal government uses NAICS to categorize each establishment in an industry on the basis of the type of goods that workers in the industry produce or the service those workers provide. Data collected for industry analyses are sorted by NAICS code, regardless of workers’ specific job duties.

For example, all workers in a restaurant are part of the food services and drinking places industry, which is in the leisure and hospitality industry sector. Employment in the food services and drinking places industry includes restaurant managers, building cleaners, and accountants—as well as bartenders, chefs, waiters and waitresses, and other staff.

More information about projections for industry employment, occupational employment, the labor force, and the economy is available from the BLS Employment Projections program.

Related Subjects

About the Author

Kathleen Green is an economist in the Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections, BLS. She can be reached at green.kathleen@bls.gov .

Suggested citation:

Kathleen Green, "Projected new jobs by major industry sector, 2016–26," Career Outlook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, December 2017.

Telephone: 1-202-691-5700 www.bls.gov/careeroutlook Contact Career Outlook

View this page on regular www.bls.gov

Permanently disable mobile site