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Share of women in occupations with many projected openings, 2016–26

| March 2018

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Women predominate in many of the occupations that are projected to have high levels of openings over the 2016–26 decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). 

The chart shows the 20 occupations that are projected to have the most openings each year, on average, for all workers over the 2016–26 decade. And 13 of these occupations employed more women than men in 2016.

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Shares of women and men employed, 2016, in occupations with the most projected annual openings, on average, 2016–26
Occupation Women's share of employment, 2016 Men's share of employment, 2016 Occupational openings, projected 2016–26 annual average Education typically needed for entry Training typically needed to attain competency

Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical, and executive(1)

94.6% 5.4% 244,300 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Childcare workers

94.4% 5.6% 189,100 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Registered nurses

90.0% 10.0% 203,700 Bachelor's degree None

Maids and housekeeping cleaners

89.6% 10.4% 202,000 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks

88.5% 11.5% 186,400 Some college, no degree Moderate-term on-the-job training

Nursing assistants(1)

88.1% 11.9% 195,100 Postsecondary nondegree award None

Home health aides(1)

88.1% 11.9% 168,600 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Personal care aides

84.9% 15.1% 414,300 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Office clerks, general

82.8% 17.2% 356,200 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Cashiers

73.2% 26.8% 653,700 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

Waiters and waitresses

70.0% 30.0% 522,700 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

Customer service representatives

65.0% 35.0% 373,500 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Combined food preparation and serving workers, including fast food

63.5% 36.5% 736,000 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

Retail salespersons

48.4% 51.6% 670,300 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

Cooks, restaurant(1),(2)

38.7% 61.3% 195,300 No formal educational credential Moderate-term on-the-job training

Stock clerks and order fillers

37.0% 63.0% 269,200 High school diploma or equivalent Short-term on-the-job training

Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners(1)

34.2% 65.8% 344,100 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

General and operations managers(3)

29.8% 70.2% 210,700 Bachelor's degree None

Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand

18.1% 81.9% 388,400 No formal educational credential Short-term on-the-job training

Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers(1)

6.0% 94.0% 213,500 Postsecondary nondegree award Short-term on-the-job training
Footnotes:

(1) Women's share of employment in this detailed occupation may not be representative of their share in the broad occupation for which data are collected by gender.

(2) This occupation typically requires less than 5 years of work experience in a related occupation to enter.

(3) This occupation typically requires 5 years or more of work experience in a related occupation to enter.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey (employment shares) and Office of Employment Projections (openings, education, and training). For occupation titles shown in the chart, this crosswalk provides equivalents from the Current Population Survey for National Employment Matrix/Standard Occupation Classification system detailed occupations.

 

Projected openings are not specific to gender. Openings for all workers in an occupation arise from employment growth and when workers retire, transfer to another occupation, or leave for some other reason. Most of the openings in the occupations shown in the chart are projected to arise from workers who leave the occupation permanently, rather than from job growth.

BLS also has information about the education typically required to enter an occupation and the training needed to attain competency in the occupation. Hover over a bar in the chart to see those details, along with the projected openings data.

Data on shares of workers by gender are from the BLS Current Population Survey, a monthly survey of households that collects information about demographic and labor force characteristics. Data on projected occupational openings and typical entry-level education come from the BLS Office of Employment Projections.

About the Author

Domingo Angeles is an economist in the Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections, BLS. He can be reached at angeles.domingo@bls.gov

Suggested citation:

Domingo Angeles, "Share of women in occupations with many projected openings, 2016–26," Career Outlook, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, March 2018.

Telephone: 1-202-691-5700 www.bls.gov/careeroutlook Contact Career Outlook

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