Jay Stewart, Ph.D.

Division Chief,
Bureau of Labor Statistics,
Division of Productivity Research and Program Development

Contact Information Phone (202) 691-7376
E-mail Email
Fields of Interest Labor economics; hours measurement;time use research
Education

Ph.D., Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, 1989
M.A., Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, 1984
B.A., Business Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1981

Professional Experience

Division Chief, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2009 - present
Research Economist, Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1991 - 2009
Visiting Assistant Professor, Tulane University, 9/89 - 6/91
Economist, Unicon Research Corp., 7/88 - 8/89

Selected Publications and Working Papers

  • “Reconciling the Divergence in Aggregate U.S. Wage Series”, (with Julien Champagne and Andre Kurmann). Labour Economics 49, December 2017, pp. 27-41.
  • Secondary Childcare in the ATUS: What Does It Measure?”, (with Dori Allard) in The Economics of Multitasking, Charlene Kalenkoski and Gigi Foster eds., Palgrave MacMillan, New York, 2015.
  • Adjusting Body Mass for Measurement Error with Invalid Validation Data”, (with Charles Courtemanche and Josh Pinkston), Economics and Human Biology 19, December 2015, pp.275-293.
  • The Importance and Challenges of Measuring Work Hours”, IZA World of Labor, 2014.
  • Is the Workweek Really Overestimated?”, (with Harley Frazis). Monthly Labor Review, June 2014.
  • “Cyclical Variation in Labor Hours and Productivity Using the ATUS?” (with Michael Burda and Daniel S. Hamermesh). American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings 103(3), May 2013.
  • “How Does Nonmarket Production Affect Measured Income Inequality?” (with Harley Frazis). Journal of Population Economics 24(1), 2011.
  • “Why Do BLS Hours Series Tell Different Stories About Trends in Hours Worked?” (with Harley Frazis) in Labor in the New Economy, Katharine G. Abraham, James R. Spletzer, and Michael J. Harper, eds., NBER Studies in Income and Wealth, University of Chicago Press, 2010.

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Last Modified Date: December 4, 2017