Bureau of Labor Statistics

Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists

compensation benefits and job analysis specialists image
Specialists may present their analysis and recommendations to management.
Quick Facts: Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists
2020 Median Pay $67,190 per year
$32.30 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation Less than 5 years
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2019 94,400
Job Outlook, 2019-29 8% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2019-29 7,500

Summary

What Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists Do

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists oversee wage and nonwage programs that an organization provides to its employees in return for their work. They also evaluate position descriptions to determine details such as classification and salary.

Work Environment

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists are employed in nearly every industry. They typically work in offices, and most are full time.

How to Become a Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialist

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree and related work experience to enter the occupation.

Pay

The median annual wage for compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists was $67,190 in May 2020.

Job Outlook

Employment of compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be best for candidates whose experience includes compensation analysis, benefits administration, or human resources work.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists Do

compensation benefits and job analysis specialists image
Specialists research compensation and benefits policies and plans.

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists oversee wage and nonwage programs that an organization provides to its employees in return for their work. They also evaluate position descriptions to determine details such as classification and salary.

Duties

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists typically do the following:

  • Research compensation and benefits policies and plans
  • Use data and cost analyses to compare compensation and benefits plans
  • Evaluate position descriptions to determine classification and salary
  • Ensure that an organization complies with federal and state laws
  • Design and prepare reports summarizing research and analysis
  • Present recommendations to other human resources managers

Some specialists perform tasks within all areas of compensation, benefits, and job analysis. Others specialize in a specific area.

Compensation specialists assess an organization’s pay structure for employees. They research compensation trends and review surveys to determine how their organization’s pay compares with that of other organizations in a particular industry and region. They often perform complex data and cost analyses to evaluate compensation policies. They also ensure that the organization’s pay practices comply with federal and state laws and regulations, such as equal pay laws, minimum wage, overtime, and workers’ compensation.

Benefits specialists administer an organization’s compensation programs that are supplemental to wages, including retirement plans, leave policies, wellness programs, and insurance plans. They research, analyze, and then recommend benefits plans, policies, and programs. They frequently monitor government regulations, legislation, and benefits trends to ensure that their programs are current, legal, and competitive. They also work closely with insurance brokers and benefits carriers and manage the enrollment, delivery of benefits, and renewal to the organization’s employees.

Job analysis specialists, also known as position classifiers, evaluate an organization’s positions by writing or assigning job descriptions, determining position classifications, and preparing salary scales. When the organization introduces a new job or reviews existing jobs, specialists must conduct research and make recommendations to managers on the classification, description, status, and salary of those jobs.

Work Environment

compensation benefits and job analysis specialists image
Specialists typically work in offices, briefing workers about benefits and overseeing the enrollment process.

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists held about 94,400 jobs in 2019. The largest employers of compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists were as follows:

Professional, scientific, and technical services 17%
Insurance carriers and related activities 15
Management of companies and enterprises 12
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 8
Healthcare and social assistance 7

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists work in nearly every industry.

They typically work in offices.

Work Schedules

Most compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists work full time.

How to Become a Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialist

compensation benefits and job analysis specialists image
Specialists typically need previous work experience in human resources occupations.

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree and related work experience to enter the occupation.

Education

Employers typically require that compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists have a bachelor’s degree. Common degree fields may include business, communications, and risk management. Some employers accept additional related work experience in lieu of a degree.

Regardless of major, students interested in this occupation may find it useful to take courses in subjects such as human resources management, finance, and accounting.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Employers typically require that compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists have experience that includes compensation analysis, benefits administration, or general human resources work. Experience in related fields, such as finance, insurance, or business administration, also may be helpful. Some candidates gain this experience through internships. However, others gain experience from working in human resources occupations, such as human resources specialists.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although professional certification is not required, it demonstrates expertise. Some employers prefer to hire candidates who have certification, but other employers allow their employees to earn certification after they have begun working. Certification programs often require applicants to have several years of related work experience in order to qualify for the credential.

Many associations for human resources workers offer classes to enhance the skills of their members. Some associations, including the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans and WorldatWork, offer certification programs that specialize in compensation and benefits. Others, including the HR Certification Institute and the Society for Human Resource Management, offer general human resources credentials.

Advancement

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists may advance to become a compensation and benefits manager or a human resources manager. Specialists typically need several years of work experience to advance.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists perform data and cost analyses to evaluate their organization’s policies. They also must be able to interpret the details of contracts and laws.

Business skills. Specialists must understand basic finance and accounting. They help set the wages and benefits packages for new employees.

Communication skills. Specialists need to provide information about compensation and benefits in a way that is understandable to employees at all levels throughout their organization.

Critical-thinking skills. Specialists must be able to evaluate job positions, salary scales, promotion practices, and other compensation and benefits policies.

Pay

Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists

Median annual wages, May 2020

Business operations specialists

$71,450

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists

$67,190

Total, all occupations

$41,950

 

The median annual wage for compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists was $67,190 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $41,490, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $111,930.

In May 2020, the median annual wages for compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Professional, scientific, and technical services $73,880
Management of companies and enterprises 69,520
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 69,240
Insurance carriers and related activities 65,390
Healthcare and social assistance 60,390

Most compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists work full time.

Job Outlook

Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists

Percent change in employment, projected 2019-29

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists

8%

Business operations specialists

6%

Total, all occupations

4%

 

Employment of compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists is projected to grow 8 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Organizations will continue to hire benefits specialists to analyze, select, and update their benefits policies. Employee wellness programs are a popular way to reduce healthcare costs. Organizations will need benefits specialists to design, evaluate, and administer these programs.

In addition, organizations must offer competitive compensation packages to attract and keep highly qualified workers. To allocate their compensation funds effectively, many organizations use strategies such as pay-for-performance plans, which may include bonuses, paid leave, or other incentives as part of the compensation package. Organizations will need specialists to analyze these compensation policies and plans and to ensure that they are both competitive and cost effective.

Job Prospects

About 9,000 openings for compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Job prospects should be best for candidates whose experience includes compensation analysis, benefits administration, or human resources work.

Employment projections data for compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists, 2019-29

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Occupational Title

Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists

SOC Code13-1141
Employment, 201994,400
Projected Employment, 2029101,800
Percent Change, 2019-298
Numeric Change, 2019-297,500
Employment by IndustryGet data

State & Area Data

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY
Purchasing managers, buyers, and purchasing agents

Purchasing Managers, Buyers, and Purchasing Agents

Buyers and purchasing agents buy products and services for organizations. Purchasing managers oversee the work of buyers and purchasing agents.

Bachelor's degree $72,270
Compensation and benefits managers

Compensation and Benefits Managers

Compensation and benefits managers plan, develop, and oversee programs to pay employees.

Bachelor's degree $125,130
Human resources managers

Human Resources Managers

Human resources managers plan, coordinate, and direct the administrative functions of an organization.

Bachelor's degree $121,220
Human resource specialists

Human Resources Specialists

Human resources specialists recruit, screen, interview, and place workers. They also handle employee relations, compensation and benefits, and training.

Bachelor's degree $63,490
Insurance sales agents

Insurance Sales Agents

Insurance sales agents contact potential customers and sell one or more types of insurance.

High school diploma or equivalent $52,180
Training and development managers

Training and Development Managers

Training and development managers plan, coordinate, and direct skills- and knowledge-enhancement programs for an organization’s staff.

Bachelor's degree $115,640
training and development specialists image

Training and Development Specialists

Training and development specialists plan and administer programs that improve the skills and knowledge of their employees.

Bachelor's degree $62,700

Labor Relations Specialists

Labor relations specialists interpret and administer labor contracts.

Bachelor's degree $73,240

Contacts for More Info

Last Modified Date: Friday, April 9, 2021

Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Compensation, Benefits, and Job Analysis Specialists,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/compensation-benefits-and-job-analysis-specialists.htm (visited May 30, 2021).

Telephone: 1-202-691-5700 www.bls.gov/ooh Contact OOH

View this page on regular www.bls.gov

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