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17-1226-CHI
Friday, October 06, 2017

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County Employment and Wages in Ohio — First Quarter 2017

Eight of the 13 large counties in Ohio reported employment gains from March 2016 to March 2017, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with employment of 75,000 or more as measured by 2016 annual average employment.) Assistant Commissioner for Regional Operations Charlene Peiffer noted that Butler County had the largest increase, up 2.4 percent, followed by Franklin County, up 2.3 percent. (See table 1.)

Nationally, employment advanced 1.6 percent from March 2016 to March 2017 as 299 of the 346 largest U.S. counties registered increases. York, S.C., had the largest percentage increase with a gain of 6.8 percent over the year. Kanawha, W.Va., had the largest over-the-year percentage decrease in employment among the largest counties in the U.S., with a loss of 2.7 percent.

Among the 13 largest counties in Ohio, employment was highest in Franklin County (737,500) and Cuyahoga County (709,400) in March 2017. Four other counties—Hamilton (506,200), Summit (262,000), Montgomery (250,400), and Lucas (206,600)—had employment levels of more than 200,000. Collectively, Ohio's 13 large counties accounted for 65.2 percent of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 346 largest counties made up 72.8 percent of total U.S. employment in March 2017.

Average weekly wages increased in all of the 13 largest counties in Ohio from the first quarter of 2016 to the first quarter of 2017. Butler County had the largest percentage increase in average weekly wages, up 9.9 percent. (See table 1.) Hamilton County recorded the highest average weekly wage among the state’s large counties at $1,207, followed by Delaware County ($1,171), and Cuyahoga ($1,114). Nationally, the average weekly wage increased 6.6 percent over the year to $1,111 in the first quarter of 2017.

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 75 counties in Ohio with employment levels below 75,000. Wage levels in all of these smaller counties were below the national average in the first quarter of 2017. (See table 2.)

Large county wage changes

As noted, average weekly wages rose in all of Ohio’s large counties from the first quarter of 2016 to the first quarter of 2017. Wage gains in four of the state’s large counties placed in the top 100 of the national ranking—Butler (9.9 percent, 19th), Montgomery, (7.9 percent, 63rd), and Delaware and Lorain (both 7.3 percent, 98th). (See table 1.)

Nationally, 345 of the 346 largest counties had over-the-year increases in average weekly wages. McLean, Ill., had the largest wage gain, up 27.8 percent from the first quarter of 2016. Peoria, Ill., had the only percentage decrease in average weekly wages (-1.1 percent).

Large county average weekly wages

Hamilton County’s average weekly wage of $1,207 was the highest among the state’s 13 large counties and ranked 62nd among the 346 largest U.S. counties. Delaware County ($1,171, 70th) and Cuyahoga County ($1,114, 93rd) also reported average weekly wages above the national average of $1,111. Mahoning ($733) reported the lowest average weekly wage among the state’s large counties and ranked 335th nationwide.

Nationwide, 94 large counties had average weekly wages at or above the U.S. average of $1,111 in the first quarter of 2017. New York, N.Y., recorded the highest average weekly wage at $2,954, followed by Santa Clara, Calif., at $2,450. Rounding out the top five were San Mateo, Calif. ($2,385); San Francisco, Calif. ($2,264); and Somerset, N.J. ($2,026).

Average weekly wages in Ohio’s smaller counties

All 75 smaller counties in Ohio with employment below 75,000 had average weekly wages below the national average of $1,111. Among these smaller counties, Union had the highest average weekly wage at $1,061, while Meigs had the lowest at $580. (See table 2.)

When all 88 counties in Ohio were considered, all but 3 had wages below the national average. One reported average weekly wages less than $600, 16 had wages from $600 to $699, 37 reported wages from $700 to $799, 21 had wages from $800 to $899, and 13 had wages of $900 or more. (See chart 1.)

Additional statistics and other information

QCEW data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2016 edition of this publication contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2017 version of the national news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2016 are now available online at https://www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn16.htm. The 2017 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available in September 2018.

The County Employment and Wages release for second quarter 2017 is scheduled to be released on Tuesday, December 5, 2017.

Industry Changes

Beginning with this release, the QCEW program now uses the 2017 version of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) as the basis for the assignment and tabulation of economic data by industry. For more information on the change to NAICS, please see the Federal Register notice at www.census.gov/eos/www/naics/federal_register_notices/notices/fr08au16.pdf. For information on the use of the 2017 version of NAICS in QCEW, see www.bls.gov/cew/naics2017.htm.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.9 million employer reports cover 142.3 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States and the 13 largest counties in Ohio, first quarter 2017
Area Employment Average weekly wage (1)
March 2017 (thousands) Percent change, March 2016-17 (2) National ranking by percent change (3) Average weekly wage National ranking by level (3) Percent change, first quarter 2016-17 (2) National ranking by percent change (3)

United States (4)

142,309.2 1.6 -- $1,111 -- 6.6 --

Ohio

5,278.3 0.8 -- 976 24 6.7 25

Butler, Ohio

152.1 2.4 95 991 161 9.9 19

Cuyahoga, Ohio

709.4 0.1 294 1,114 93 6.7 148

Delaware, Ohio

85.3 2.1 114 1,171 70 7.3 98

Franklin, Ohio

737.5 2.3 98 1,106 99 6.2 189

Hamilton, Ohio

506.2 0.8 237 1,207 62 6.5 163

Lake, Ohio

93.4 -0.3 320 878 262 5.9 210

Lorain, Ohio

96.2 0.9 229 835 294 7.3 98

Lucas, Ohio

206.6 -0.3 320 946 195 7.0 126

Mahoning, Ohio

95.2 -0.1 308 733 335 7.0 126

Montgomery, Ohio

250.4 0.0 300 904 231 7.9 63

Stark, Ohio

156.2 -0.2 314 773 327 6.6 158

Summit, Ohio

262.0 0.1 294 979 170 3.7 321

Warren, Ohio

89.7 1.1 209 996 160 5.8 215
 

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Ranking does not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in Ohio, first quarter 2017
Area Employment March 2017 Average weekly wage(1)

United States(2)

142,309,185 $1,111

Ohio

5,278,342 976

Adams

6,076 719

Allen

50,384 861

Ashland

18,326 727

Ashtabula

29,421 714

Athens

21,534 762

Auglaize

21,007 795

Belmont

22,763 816

Brown

8,189 710

Butler

152,071 991

Carroll

6,747 758

Champaign

10,530 790

Clark

48,040 761

Clermont

57,541 824

Clinton

17,507 866

Columbiana

29,215 689

Coshocton

10,069 766

Crawford

13,238 719

Cuyahoga

709,442 1,114

Darke

18,420 783

Defiance

15,677 895

Delaware

85,274 1,171

Erie

34,665 754

Fairfield

43,429 708

Fayette

11,805 650

Franklin

737,467 1,106

Fulton

18,394 772

Gallia

11,359 657

Geauga

33,537 787

Greene

73,163 1,005

Guernsey

14,914 745

Hamilton

506,194 1,207

Hancock

44,960 1,001

Hardin

8,599 683

Harrison

4,091 878

Henry

10,777 743

Highland

10,408 661

Hocking

6,696 610

Holmes

19,005 691

Huron

20,205 758

Jackson

10,094 660

Jefferson

20,126 794

Knox

19,971 750

Lake

93,354 878

Lawrence

12,527 639

Licking

52,676 816

Logan

19,755 803

Lorain

96,230 835

Lucas

206,586 946

Madison

17,106 780

Mahoning

95,241 733

Marion

23,859 775

Medina

59,221 823

Meigs

3,382 580

Mercer

19,750 727

Miami

40,131 797

Monroe

2,675 606

Montgomery

250,416 904

Morgan

2,619 676

Morrow

5,165 673

Muskingum

32,686 742

Noble

3,024 702

Ottawa

12,327 858

Paulding

4,797 683

Perry

5,885 730

Pickaway

13,615 844

Pike

9,730 920

Portage

54,217 833

Preble

10,480 730

Putnam

11,601 709

Richland

49,850 728

Ross

27,665 835

Sandusky

26,133 747

Scioto

23,784 681

Seneca

19,193 693

Shelby

26,775 898

Stark

156,174 773

Summit

262,009 979

Trumbull

66,662 817

Tuscarawas

35,590 708

Union

32,252 1,061

Van Wert

10,807 726

Vinton

2,122 657

Warren

89,650 996

Washington

24,745 867

Wayne

47,364 817

Williams

17,064 769

Wood

66,904 874

Wyandot

9,045 818

Footnotes
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

NOTE: Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.
 

Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, first quarter 2017
State Employment Average weekly wage (1)
March 2017 (thousands) Percent change, March 2016-17 Average weekly wage National ranking by level Percent change, first quarter 2016-17 National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

142,309.2 1.6 $1,111 -- 6.6 --

Alabama

1,928.9 1.4 893 36 6.2 35

Alaska

312.8 -1.8 1,061 18 3.9 50

Arizona

2,743.0 2.4 991 21 8.1 4

Arkansas

1,199.9 0.7 859 45 8.5 3

California

16,831.4 2.3 1,295 6 7.6 7

Colorado

2,573.2 2.3 1,136 12 7.5 10

Connecticut

1,651.5 0.1 1,417 4 4.0 49

Delaware

433.2 0.8 1,185 9 10.7 1

District of Columbia

760.7 1.2 1,885 1 7.0 16

Florida

8,532.6 2.8 949 27 7.2 13

Georgia

4,317.1 2.7 1,068 17 6.1 37

Hawaii

653.6 0.9 954 25 6.8 22

Idaho

690.4 3.0 775 50 7.0 16

Illinois

5,842.0 0.5 1,195 8 6.3 34

Indiana

2,985.8 1.2 918 32 7.6 7

Iowa

1,518.3 0.0 899 35 6.5 30

Kansas

1,368.0 0.4 888 38 6.7 25

Kentucky

1,864.1 1.1 879 41 6.9 18

Louisiana

1,901.3 -0.5 906 33 5.5 43

Maine

586.7 1.0 860 44 7.2 13

Maryland

2,626.0 1.2 1,171 10 5.8 42

Massachusetts

3,464.0 1.1 1,428 3 7.7 6

Michigan

4,230.6 1.7 1,041 20 6.8 22

Minnesota

2,806.4 2.1 1,149 11 7.9 5

Mississippi

1,122.9 0.1 750 51 5.3 46

Missouri

2,767.0 1.4 930 31 5.9 38

Montana

451.5 1.4 800 49 6.5 30

Nebraska

960.7 0.4 868 42 6.4 33

Nevada

1,311.6 3.8 932 30 6.9 18

New Hampshire

643.2 1.2 1,070 16 7.3 11

New Jersey

3,955.1 1.5 1,333 5 5.0 47

New Mexico

803.3 0.2 838 46 5.9 38

New York

9,159.3 1.3 1,541 2 5.9 38

North Carolina

4,287.0 1.8 991 21 6.9 18

North Dakota

405.7 -1.0 953 26 5.0 47

Ohio

5,278.3 0.8 976 24 6.7 25

Oklahoma

1,563.9 -1.0 883 39 5.9 38

Oregon

1,855.0 2.5 984 23 5.4 45

Pennsylvania

5,712.3 0.8 1,078 15 6.5 30

Rhode Island

465.4 0.3 1,055 19 7.2 13

South Carolina

2,017.9 2.2 864 43 7.3 11

South Dakota

413.4 0.7 819 48 6.2 35

Tennessee

2,906.2 1.8 945 28 6.7 25

Texas

11,924.5 1.7 1,124 14 5.5 43

Utah

1,411.3 3.1 905 34 6.6 29

Vermont

305.6 0.2 889 37 6.7 25

Virginia

3,796.3 1.4 1,129 13 6.9 18

Washington

3,225.9 2.6 1,215 7 8.6 2

West Virginia

678.2 -0.8 837 47 7.6 7

Wisconsin

2,803.7 1.1 933 29 6.8 22

Wyoming

262.4 -2.3 880 40 3.3 51

Puerto Rico

887.7 -0.9 526 (3) 1.2 (3)

Virgin Islands

38.7 0.0 797 (3) 3.1 (3)

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

 

Last Modified Date: Friday, October 06, 2017