News Release Information

17-212-CHI
Friday, March 24, 2017

Contacts

Technical information:
Media contact:
  • (312) 353-1138

County Employment and Wages in Wisconsin — Third Quarter 2016

Wisconsin’s six large counties had employment increases from September 2015 to September 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with 2015 annual average employment levels of 75,000 or more.) Dane County had the largest increase, up 2.6 percent, followed by Winnebago County, up 2.0 percent. Assistant Commissioner for Regional Operations Charlene Peiffer noted that the employment gains in four of the state’s large counties were less than the national increase of 1.7 percent. (See table 1.)

Among the six large counties in Wisconsin, employment was highest in Milwaukee (487,000) in September 2016, followed by Dane (330,700), and Waukesha (239,000). Each of the three other counties—Brown, Outagamie, and Winnebago—had employment levels of less than 155,000. Collectively, Wisconsin's six large counties accounted for 49.5 percent of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 344 largest counties made up 72.5 percent of total U.S. employment.

The average weekly wage in Dane County rose 10.1 percent from the third quarter of 2015 to the third quarter of 2016, the largest increase among Wisconsin's large counties, followed by Brown and Waukesha Counties at 6.7 percent and 5.2 percent, respectively. Dane County had the highest average weekly wage in the state at $1,032, followed by Waukesha County at $1,006 and Milwaukee County at $970. (See table 1.) Nationally, the average weekly wage rose 5.4 percent over the year to $1,027 in the third quarter of 2016.

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 66 counties in Wisconsin with employment below 75,000. All of these smaller counties had average weekly wages below the national average. (See table 2.)

Large county wage changes

Two of Wisconsin’s six large counties recorded wage gains greater than the national increase of 5.4 percent from the third quarter of 2015 to the third quarter of 2016. (See table 1.) As noted, Dane County had the state’s largest average weekly wage increase, up 10.1 percent, and ranked seventh among the 344 largest U.S. counties. The over-the-year wage gain in Brown County, at 6.7 percent, ranked 79th nationally. The four remaining counties had average weekly wage increases ranging from 5.2 to 4.4 percent.

Nationally, 339 of the 344 largest counties registered over-the-year wage increases. Clark, Nev., had the largest wage gain, up 12.2 percent from the third quarter of 2015. Manatee, Fla., was second with a wage increase of 10.7 percent, followed by Hillsborough, N.H. (10.4 percent); and Boone, Ky., and Elkhart, Ind. (10.3 percent each).

Among the largest U.S. counties, five experienced over-the-year wage decreases. Rockland, N.Y., had the largest wage decrease with a loss of 14.9 percent. Lafayette, La., had the second largest decrease in average weekly wages, down 3.4 percent from the third quarter 2015, followed by Benton, Ark. (-2.0 percent); Lake, Ill. (-0.9 percent); and Midland, Texas (-0.3 percent).

Large county average weekly wages

Average weekly wages in five of Wisconsin’s six largest counties were below the national average of $1,027 in the third quarter of 2016. As noted, Dane County ($1,032) had the highest average weekly wage in the state, ranking 98th among the 344 largest U.S. counties. Waukesha ($1,006) and Milwaukee ($970) Counties placed 118th and 153rd, respectively. The state’s remaining large counties had average weekly wages that placed in the bottom half of the national ranking.

Nationwide, average weekly wages were at or above the U.S. average ($1,027) in 103 of the 344 largest counties in the third quarter of 2016. Santa Clara, Calif., recorded the highest average weekly wage at $2,260, followed by San Mateo, Calif. ($2,098); San Francisco, Calif. ($1,892); New York, N.Y. ($1,879); and Washington, D.C. ($1,728).

Among the largest U.S. counties, 241 had weekly wages below the national average in the third quarter of 2016. Horry County, S.C. ($632) reported the lowest wage, followed by Cameron, Texas ($636); Hidalgo, Texas ($654); and Webb, Texas ($680).

Average weekly wages in Wisconsin’s smaller counties

Of the 66 counties in Wisconsin with employment below 75,000, Racine County had the highest average weekly wage at $896. Florence County had the lowest weekly wage at $528, followed by Bayfield at $542. (See table 2.)

When all 72 counties in Wisconsin were considered, 14 reported average weekly wages of $649 or lower, 29 had wages from $650 to $749, 18 had wages from $750 to $849, and 11 had wages of $850 or higher. (See chart 1.)

Additional statistics and other information

Quarterly data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit the QCEW Web site at www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2015 edition of this publication contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2016 version of the national news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2015 are now available online at www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn15.htm. The 2016 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available in September 2017.

The County Employment and Wages release for fourth quarter 2016 is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, June 7, 2017.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.8 million employer reports cover 142.9 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States and the 6 largest counties in Wisconsin, third quarter 2016
Area Employment Average weekly wage (1)
September 2016 (thousands) Percent change, September 2015-16 (2) National ranking by percent change (3) Average weekly wage National ranking by level (3) Percent change, third quarter 2015-16 (2) National ranking by percent change (3)

United States (4)

142,940.5 1.7 -- $1,027 -- 5.4 --

Wisconsin

2,850.1 1.0 -- 885 31 6.2 14

Brown, Wis.

154.6 1.5 195 904 211 6.7 79

Dane, Wis.

330.7 2.6 96 1,032 98 10.1 7

Milwaukee, Wis.

487.0 0.5 283 970 153 4.5 254

Outagamie, Wis.

107.0 1.4 203 875 242 4.8 233

Waukesha, Wis.

239.0 0.4 292 1,006 118 5.2 205

Winnebago, Wis.

93.1 2.0 142 924 190 4.4 262

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Ranking does not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in Wisconsin, third quarter 2016
Area Employment September 2016 Average weekly wage(1)

United States(2)

142,940,452 $1,027

Wisconsin

2,850,076 885

Adams

4,846 668

Ashland

8,194 702

Barron

21,826 721

Bayfield

4,393 542

Brown

154,590 904

Buffalo

3,772 691

Burnett

4,674 608

Calumet

13,917 728

Chippewa

24,974 740

Clark

10,980 700

Columbia

22,412 755

Crawford

7,648 658

Dane

330,667 1,032

Dodge

35,585 826

Door

14,827 634

Douglas

15,622 758

Dunn

17,467 765

Eau Claire

57,117 832

Florence

1,018 528

Fond du Lac

46,985 848

Forest

3,156 684

Grant

17,729 691

Green

15,794 707

Green Lake

6,467 721

Iowa

10,091 720

Iron

1,690 586

Jackson

8,763 765

Jefferson

32,479 746

Juneau

9,301 735

Kenosha

64,414 780

Kewaunee

7,164 728

La Crosse

69,196 818

Lafayette

4,109 657

Langlade

7,495 659

Lincoln

10,984 779

Manitowoc

33,586 816

Marathon

70,777 856

Marinette

18,438 772

Marquette

3,860 632

Menominee

2,053 578

Milwaukee

487,048 970

Monroe

20,471 760

Oconto

9,203 646

Oneida

16,873 751

Outagamie

107,012 875

Ozaukee

43,337 853

Pepin

2,305 696

Pierce

10,086 670

Polk

16,259 723

Portage

34,464 806

Price

5,649 734

Racine

74,621 896

Richland

5,963 670

Rock

65,067 841

Rusk

5,131 660

St. Croix

33,560 757

Sauk

36,340 731

Sawyer

7,054 642

Shawano

12,690 619

Sheboygan

60,703 886

Taylor

8,095 713

Trempealeau

14,569 737

Vernon

9,039 648

Vilas

7,957 592

Walworth

41,557 720

Washburn

5,912 640

Washington

54,518 825

Waukesha

238,963 1,006

Waupaca

20,225 693

Waushara

6,247 623

Winnebago

93,145 924

Wood

38,288 864

Footnotes
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

NOTE: Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.
 

Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, third quarter 2016
State Employment Average weekly wage (1)
September 2016 (thousands) Percent change, September 2015-16 Average weekly wage National ranking by level Percent change, third quarter 2015-16 National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

142,940.5 1.7 $1,027 -- 5.4 --

Alabama

1,923.8 1.5 870 36 4.9 38

Alaska

337.4 -2.6 1,055 12 1.2 49

Arizona

2,695.5 3.1 950 24 6.9 5

Arkansas

1,205.4 1.0 794 48 5.2 32

California

16,871.1 2.4 1,210 4 6.7 8

Colorado

2,576.5 2.6 1,062 10 5.6 23

Connecticut

1,674.2 0.3 1,204 5 5.0 34

Delaware

440.7 0.8 1,022 16 5.6 23

District of Columbia

759.2 1.7 1,728 1 3.8 45

Florida

8,320.2 3.7 905 29 6.2 14

Georgia

4,290.4 2.9 969 21 5.9 18

Hawaii

648.4 1.8 956 23 6.7 8

Idaho

703.7 3.5 782 50 6.3 12

Illinois

5,933.6 0.6 1,062 10 4.4 40

Indiana

3,025.9 1.8 866 37 5.9 18

Iowa

1,548.6 0.8 873 35 6.2 14

Kansas

1,377.2 0.5 857 39 5.9 18

Kentucky

1,880.2 1.5 857 39 6.5 10

Louisiana

1,908.8 -0.9 883 32 2.9 48

Maine

616.2 0.9 825 45 5.9 18

Maryland

2,648.1 1.4 1,124 8 5.3 30

Massachusetts

3,522.9 2.0 1,277 2 6.8 7

Michigan

4,292.2 2.1 976 19 5.9 18

Minnesota

2,849.5 1.6 1,053 13 6.4 11

Mississippi

1,126.9 0.7 739 51 4.7 39

Missouri

2,782.1 1.6 888 30 5.0 34

Montana

464.5 1.5 792 49 4.3 41

Nebraska

973.9 0.9 857 39 5.5 26

Nevada

1,300.7 3.8 949 25 10.1 1

New Hampshire

655.0 1.8 1,027 15 7.9 2

New Jersey

4,000.0 1.8 1,173 7 5.0 34

New Mexico

811.5 0.2 830 44 4.0 43

New York

9,216.6 1.6 1,222 3 3.5 46

North Carolina

4,290.3 2.3 909 28 5.3 30

North Dakota

423.2 -3.4 964 22 0.7 50

Ohio

5,347.3 1.1 924 26 5.4 27

Oklahoma

1,578.7 -1.3 854 42 3.5 46

Oregon

1,866.5 2.6 970 20 5.2 32

Pennsylvania

5,776.7 1.0 1,013 17 5.4 27

Rhode Island

481.1 0.8 990 18 7.6 3

South Carolina

2,008.6 2.5 832 43 5.6 23

South Dakota

424.2 1.1 809 47 7.0 4

Tennessee

2,918.8 2.5 912 27 5.4 27

Texas

11,830.7 1.3 1,042 14 4.3 41

Utah

1,407.4 3.8 881 33 6.3 12

Vermont

309.9 0.5 880 34 6.2 14

Virginia

3,801.0 1.0 1,063 9 5.0 34

Washington

3,278.9 3.0 1,188 6 6.9 5

West Virginia

691.5 -1.6 816 46 3.9 44

Wisconsin

2,850.1 1.0 885 31 6.2 14

Wyoming

274.8 -4.7 865 38 0.0 51

Puerto Rico

888.2 -0.4 524 (3) 2.3 (3)

Virgin Islands

37.4 1.4 778 (3) 5.9 (3)

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 


 

 

Last Modified Date: Friday, March 24, 2017