Beyond the Numbers

PRICES & SPENDING   •  Feb 2016  •  Volume 5 / Number 1

Expenditures on cellular phone services have increased significantly since 2007

Expenditures on cellular phone services have increased significantly since 2007

In 2007, U.S. consumers spent more on cellular phone service than they did on residential landline phone services for the first time. Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) show that expenditures on cellular phone services continue to rise rapidly.

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