Beyond the Numbers

PAY & BENEFITS   •  Mar 2014  •  Volume 3 / Number 6

Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners

Employer-sponsored benefits extended to domestic partners

The BLS National Compensation Survey (NCS) publishes data annually on the availability of employee benefits, such as health care and retirement plans, and has expanded the scope of the survey to capture data on the availability of health care benefits and defined-benefit pension survivor benefits for unmarried opposite-sex and same-sex partners. This issue of Beyond the Numbers looks at the frequency with which health and defined-benefit plans are extended to unmarried domestic partners.

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