Occupational Information Included in the OOH

The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) is a career resource offering information on the hundreds of occupations that provide the overwhelming majority of jobs in the United States. Each occupational profile describes the duties required by the occupation, the work environment of that occupation, the typical education and training needed to enter the occupation, the median pay for workers in the occupation, and the job outlook into the next 10 years for that occupation. Each profile is in a standard format that makes it easy to compare occupations.

Sections of Occupational Profiles

Summary

All profiles have a “Quick Facts” table that gives information on the following topics:

2012 Median Pay: The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey. In May 2012, the median annual wage for all workers was $34,750.

Entry-Level Education: The typical level of education that most workers need to enter the occupation.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation: Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

On-the-job Training: Postemployment training necessary to attain competency in the skills needed in the occupation; the training is occupation specific rather than job specific, in that the skills learned can be transferred to another job in the same occupation.

Number of Jobs, 2012: The employment, or size, of the occupation in 2012, the base year of the 2012–22 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2012–22: The projected percent change in employment from 2012 to 2022. The average growth rate for all occupations is 11 percent.

Employment Change, 2012–22: The projected numeric change in employment from 2012 to 2022.

The summary section briefly describes all of the sections included in each occupational profile.

What They Do

This section describes the main work of people in the occupation.

All occupations have a list of duties or typical tasks performed by these workers. The list includes daily responsibilities, such as answering phone calls or taking a patient’s medical history.

This section also may describe the equipment, tools, software, or other items that people in the occupation typically use. For example, medical records and health information technicians frequently use electronic health records to document a patient’s medical information. The section also may describe those with whom workers in the occupation interact, such as clients, patients, and coworkers.

Some profiles discuss specific specialties, job titles, or types of occupations within a given occupation. This subsection includes a brief explanation of each specialty’s job duties and how specialties differ from one another. For example, the profile on dentists includes several specialties, such as orthodontists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and pediatric dentists.

Work Environment

This section describes an occupation’s working conditions, including the workplace, expected level of physical activity, and typical hours.

The section typically begins by noting the employment size of the occupation in 2012 and often includes a table of the industries or settings that employed the most workers in the occupation that year. The section also notes whether employees sometimes need to travel, and if so, how frequently. The section describes the workplace and discusses whether employees work in a safe work environment (such as an office) or a potentially hazardous one (such as a commercial fishing boat). If the workplace is hazardous, the section lists the type of equipment an employee must wear, such as a hardhat or protective goggles, to guard against accidents or exposure to harmful conditions. A subsection on Injuries and Illnesses may appear if this information is notable. 

Work Schedules

This subsection includes information on the typical schedule for workers in an occupation, noting whether the majority of workers are employed full time or part time. Full-time workers typically work 35 or more hours in a week, whereas part-time employees work less than 35 hours. For some occupations, the profile also might also include the time of day an employee is expected to begin work and for how long. Registered nurses, for example, may work all hours of the day and on weekends because medical facilities are open around the clock. A discussion of work schedules for occupations in which work may be seasonal, such as farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers, also is in this section.

How to Become One

This section describes the typical paths for entry into, and advancement in, an occupation. All profiles have subsections on education and important qualities of workers in the occupation. Optional subsections include information on work experience; training; other experience, such as volunteering or internships; licenses, certifications, and registrations; and advancement.

Education

This subsection describes the education that most workers typically need to enter an occupation. Some occupations require no formal education, whereas others may require, for example, a doctoral or professional degree. In some occupations, such as computer support specialists, workers can enter with different educational backgrounds. In these cases, the profile discusses all of the typical paths for entry into the occupation.

This subsection also may include information on the college majors and subjects that people study in preparation for the occupation, as well as a list of typical courses that may aid a high school student in preparing for an occupation. For example, high school students interested in applying to respiratory therapy programs should take courses in health, biology, mathematics, chemistry, and physics.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

This subsection describes whether employers require work experience in a related occupation. Many managerial occupations rely on work experience in a related occupation. For example, architectural and engineering managers typically have previous work experience as an architect or engineer.

Training

This subsection describes the typical on-the-job training necessary to attain competency in an occupation, including both practical and classroom training that workers receive after being hired. For example, firefighters must complete training at a fire academy or at an institution with a similar program before they are considered prepared to combat fires.

Apprenticeships, internships, and residency programs are also discussed this subsection. For example, the profile on physicians and surgeons includes information on residency programs and the architects profile has information on internships that architects complete as part of a training program to become licensed.

Other Experience

This subsection describes other types of experience that would be helpful or essential in getting a job in the occupation, such as experience gained through volunteering or student internships completed while one is in school.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

This subsection describes whether credentials such as licenses, certifications, and registrations typically are needed for an occupation and, if so, how workers can earn the credentials.

States issue licenses to workers to signify that they have met specific legal requirements to practice in certain occupations. To become licensed, workers usually need to pass an examination and comply with eligibility requirements, such as possessing a minimum level of education, work experience, or training; or completing an internship, a residency, or a formal apprenticeship. States have their own regulatory boards that set standards for practicing a licensed occupation, so rules and eligibility criteria may vary from state to state, even for the same occupation.

Some occupations have certifications available that typically are voluntary. For example, fitness trainers and instructors are encouraged, but not required, to become certified before entering the occupation. Some employers will allow a trainer or instructor to become certified after being hired.

Certification requires demonstrated competency in a skill or a set of skills and commonly requires passing an examination or having a certain amount and type of work experience or training. For some certification programs, the candidate must have a certain level of education before becoming eligible for certification.

This subsection explains any prerequisites for certification, licensure, or registration, as well as how a person would complete them—such as by passing an exam, performing a certain type of work, or receiving certain training or education. If states require workers to be certified before they can be licensed, this section also notes that information.

Certification should not be confused with certificates from an educational institution. A certificate awarded by a postsecondary educational institution is a postsecondary non-degree award and is discussed in the subsection on education.

Registrations typically are required and issued by state or local governments. Workers seeking registration may need to be licensed or certified. In most cases, workers must pay fees to receive or maintain their registration.  

Important Qualities

This subsection describes important characteristics of workers in the occupation and includes an explanation of why those characteristics are useful.

The qualities include areas of skills, aptitudes, and personal characteristics. For example, an emergency medical technician must be physically strong, and a web developer needs creativity and customer-service skills.

Advancement

This subsection describes the advancement opportunities for workers in the occupation.

Opportunities for advancement can come from within the occupation, such as a promotion to a supervisory or managerial level; from advancement into another occupation, such as moving from a computer support specialist to a network and computer systems administrator; or by becoming self-employed, such as a dentist opening up his or her own practice.

The subsection often explains the requirements for advancement, such as certification or additional formal education.

Pay

This section discusses the wages of workers in the occupation.

Almost all occupational profiles in the OOH show median wage data for wage and salary workers in the occupation. The data are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey. The median wage is the wage at which half of the workers in an occupation earned more and half earned less. A chart that compares the median wage of workers in the occupation to the median wage of workers across all occupations accompanies the wage data.

Profiles typically include median wages and the wages earned by the top 10 percent and bottom 10 percent of workers in the occupation. Many also include wages earned by workers in selected industries—those in which most of an occupation’s workers are employed. The wage data by industry are also from the OES survey.

Some occupational profiles may cite wage data from sources other than the BLS. For example, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics provides wage data on dietitians and nutritionists. Unless otherwise noted, the source of pay data for occupations in the OOH is the OES survey.

The “Pay” section provides work schedule information, also found in the “Work Environment” section. The section also might include, when noteworthy, information about union membership.

Job Outlook

This section describes how employment is projected to grow or decline between 2012 and 2022. In addition to presenting these projections, the section discusses the major factors expected to affect the outlook for employment in the occupation. Some of the factors are changes in technology, in business practices, and in demographics.

The outlook section sometimes includes a “Job Prospects” subsection, which provides a qualitative discussion of the relative ease or difficulty experienced by those who seek to enter the occupation.

Similar Occupations

This section links to other occupational profiles with similar job duties or similar required skills.

More Information

This section includes external links to associations, organizations, and other institutions that provide readers with additional information. The section also includes links to the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) system for the occupation or occupations included in the profile. State employment service offices use O*NET to classify applicants and job openings. For each occupation, O*NET lists a number of descriptors, including common tasks, necessary knowledge and skills, and frequently used technology.

Key phrases in the OOH

The following tables explain how to interpret the key phrases used to describe projected changes in employment:

Changing employment between 2012 and 2022
If the statement reads:Employment is projected to:
Grow much faster than averageincrease 22 percent or more
Grow faster than averageincrease 15 to 21 percent
Grow about as fast as averageincrease 8 to 14 percent
Grow more slowly than averageincrease 3 to 7 percent
Little or no changedecrease 2 percent to increase 2 percent
Declinedecrease 3 percent or more
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Occupational Information Included in the OOH,
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/about/occupational-information-included-in-the-ooh.htm (visited July 31, 2014).

Publish Date: Wednesday, January 8, 2014