Payroll employment advanced in July

August 09, 2005

Total nonfarm employment rose by 207,000 in July 2005.

Change in employees on nonfarm payroll, selected industries, June 2005 - July 2005
[Chart data—TXT]

In July, there were employment gains in many service-providing industries, including retail trade, professional and technical services, financial activities, food services, and health care.

Retail trade employment rose by 50,000 in July. Retail employment gains were widespread, including growth in clothing stores, motor vehicle and parts dealers, and building material and garden supply stores.

Employment in food services and drinking places rose by 30,000 over the month.

The health care industry continued to grow in July, adding 29,000 jobs. Ambulatory health care services (which includes doctors' offices and outpatient clinics), hospitals, and nursing and residential care facilities all contributed to the employment gain.

Employment in professional and technical services increased by 23,000 in July. Management and technical consulting services, as well as architectural and engineering services, contributed to the July gain.

Employment in financial activities rose by 21,000 over the month, as credit intermediation and real estate showed continued strength.

These data on industry employment are from the Current Employment Statistics program and have been seasonally adjusted. More information about recent employment trends can be found in "The Employment Situation: July 2005" (PDF) (TXT), news release USDL 05-1459. Data for the most recent two months are preliminary.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Payroll employment advanced in July on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2005/aug/wk2/art02.htm (visited April 24, 2014).

OF INTEREST

Spotlight on Statistics: Productivity

This edition of Spotlight on Statistics examines labor productivity trends from 2000 through 2010 for selected industries and sectors within the nonfarm business sector of the U.S. economy.  Read more »