Metropolitan division employment and unemployment, September 2012

November 01, 2012

In September 2012, 32 of the 34 metropolitan divisions for which unemployment data are available recorded over-the-year jobless rate decreases, while two registered increases. Twenty-nine of the 32 metropolitan divisions for which employment data are available reported over-the-year employment gains, while 3 reported losses.

In September 2012, Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, Michigan, registered the highest jobless rate among the divisions, 11.3 percent, followed by Lawrence-Methuen-Salem, Massachusetts (10.9 percent) and Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California (10.2 percent). Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick, Maryland, and Framingham, Massachusetts, reported the lowest division rates (5.0 percent each), followed by Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (5.4 percent).

Unemployment rates, selected metropolitan divisions, not seasonally adjusted, September 2012
Unemployment rates, selected metropolitan divisions, not seasonally adjusted, September 2012
Metropolitan divisionUnemployment rate (in percent)

Detroit-Livonia-Dearborn, MI

11.3

Lawrence-Methuen-Salem, MA

10.9

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, CA

10.2

Camden, NJ

9.8

West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach, FL

9.2

Bethesda-Rockvillle-Frederick, MD

5.0

Framingham, MA

5.0

Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

5.4

Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA

5.5

Nashua, NH-MA

5.5

These data are featured in the TED article, Metropolitan division employment and unemployment, September 2012.

In 5 of the 11 metropolitan areas that contain divisions, the ranges between the highest and lowest division jobless rates were 2.0 percentage points or more in September. Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, Massachusetts-New Hampshire, recorded the largest rate difference among its divisions, 5.9 percentage points (Lawrence-Methuen-Salem, Massachusetts-New Hampshire, 10.9 percent, compared with Framingham, Massachusetts, 5.0 percent).

From September 2011 to September 2012, the largest over-the-year percentage increase in employment among the metropolitan divisions was reported in Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington (+3.4 percent), followed by San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, California (+3.1 percent), and Tacoma, Washington (+3.0 percent).

Over-the-year percent change in nonfarm employment, slected metropolitan divisions, not seasonally adjusted, September 2011-September 2012
Over-the-year percent change in nonfarm employment, selected metropolitan divisions, not seasonally adjusted, September 2011–September 2012
Metropolitan divisionPercent change

Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, WA

3.4

San Francisco-San Mateo-Redwood City, CA

3.1

Tacoma, WA

3.0

Peabody, MA

2.8

Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA

2.7

Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, MA-NH

-2.1

Nashua, NH-MA

-1.4

West Palm Beach-Boca Raton-Boynton Beach, FL

-0.2

These data are featured in the TED article, Metropolitan division employment and unemployment, September 2012.

In September 2012, three metropolitan divisions reported an over-the-year percentage decrease in employment: Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, Massachusetts-New Hampshire (−2.1 percent), Nashua, New Hampshire-Massachusetts (−1.4 percent), and Haverhill-North Andover-Amesbury, Massachusetts-New Hampshire (−0.2 percent).

These metropolitan area data are from the Current Employment Statistics (State and Area) and Local Area Unemployment Statistics programs; these data are not seasonally adjusted. Data for the most recent month are preliminary and subject to revision. Metropolitan divisions are essentially separately identifiable employment centers within a metropolitan area. To learn more, see "Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment — September 2012" (HTML) (PDF), news release USDL-12-2161.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Editor's Desk, Metropolitan division employment and unemployment, September 2012 on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2012/ted_20121101.htm (visited August 20, 2014).

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