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17-1698-ATL
Tuesday, January 30, 2018

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Employer-Reported Workplace Injuries and Illnesses in South Carolina – 2016

Over 32,000 nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses were reported among South Carolina’s private industry employers in 2016, resulting in an incidence rate of 2.5 cases per 100 full-time equivalent workers, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (See table A.) Regional Commissioner Janet S. Rankin noted that South Carolina was among 13 states and the District of Columbia that had an incidence rate of total recordable cases (TRC) significantly lower than the national rate of 2.9. (South Carolina was 1 of 41 states and the District of Columbia for which statewide estimates are available. See Technical Note at the end of this release for more information about the survey.)

South Carolina’s findings from the 2016 Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses include:

  • TRC incidence rates in private industry ranged from 0.7 in financial activities to 3.9 in natural resources and mining. (See table 1.)
  • Two supersectors, with about 38 percent of private industry employment, accounted for 49 percent of the occupational injuries and illnesses: trade, transportation, and utilities; and manufacturing. (See table 2.)
  • In private industry, the TRC injury and illness incidence rate ranged from 1.4 for small establishments (those employing fewer than 11 workers) to 3.4 for small mid-size establishments (those employing between 50 and 249 workers). (See table 3.)
  • South Carolina’s private industry TRC rate of 2.5 in 2016 was similar to its TRC rate in 2015. (See table 4.)

Table A. Number and rate of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses in private industry, United States and South Carolina, 2016
CharacteristicUnited StatesSouth Carolina
Number
(in thousands)
Rate
(per 100 workers)
Number
(in thousands)
Rate
(per 100 workers)

Total cases

2,857.42.932.82.5

Cases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction

1,547.81.618.71.4

Cases with days away from work

892.30.99.90.7

Cases with job transfer or restriction

655.60.78.80.7

Other recordable cases

1,309.51.314.11.1

Private industry injury and illness case types

Of the 32,800 private industry injury and illness cases reported in South Carolina, 18,700 were of a more severe nature, involving days away from work, job transfer, or restriction—commonly referred to as DART cases. These cases occurred at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100 full-time workers. Fifty-three percent of the DART cases in South Carolina were incidents that resulted in at least one day away from work, compared to 58 percent nationally. Other recordable cases (those not involving days away from work, job transfer, or restriction) accounted for the remaining 14,100 cases in South Carolina, at a rate of 1.1. In comparison, the national rate for other recordable cases was 1.3.

In South Carolina, the DART incidence rate for the leisure and hospitality sector was significantly higher from the previous year. No other supersector had a significant change in its TRC or DART incidence rate over the year.

In 2016, 31,000 (94.5 percent) of private industry recordable injuries and illnesses were injuries. Workplace illnesses accounted for an additional 1,800 recordable cases. Three categories—skin disorders, hearing loss, and respiratory illnesses—accounted for 39 percent of the occupational illnesses in South Carolina. Nationally, these three categories amounted to 36 percent of the work-related illness total.

State and local government injury and illness cases

Among the state and local government sector in South Carolina, 10,900 injury and illness cases were reported in 2016, resulting in a rate of 4.4 cases per 100 full-time workers. Nationally, the rate was 4.7. Approximately 79 percent of injuries and illnesses reported in South Carolina’s public sector occurred among local government workers.

State estimates

Private industry and public sector estimates are available for 41 participating states and for the District of Columbia for 2016. (See chart1.) The private industry injury and illness rate was statistically higher in 21 states than the national rate of 2.9 cases per 100 full-time workers, lower in 13 states and in the District of Columbia, and not statistically different in 7 states.

Six states—Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, and Utah—reported declines in their TRC rate from a year earlier. Kansas was the only state in which the rate rose from the previous year. Differences in the industry composition in each state account for some of the differences in injury and illness incidence rates across states.


Changes to the National News Release Format

Beginning with the 2016 reference year, the SOII will issue a single release of national data. The national release includes industry counts and rates, along with case circumstances and worker characteristics for cases requiring days away from work. In previous years, these data were released separately.


Technical Note

The Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) is a Federal/State program in which employer's reports are collected annually from approximately 200,000 private industry and public sector (State and local government) establishments and processed by State agencies in cooperation with the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Summary information on the number of injuries and illnesses is transcribed by these employers directly from their recordkeeping logs to the survey questionnaire. The questionnaire also asks for the number of employee hours worked (needed in the calculation of incidence rates) as well as its annual average employment (needed to verify the unit's employment-size class).

Occupational injury and illness data for establishments in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries and for railroad activities are provided by the Department of Labor's Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and the Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), respectively. The SOII excludes all work-related fatalities as well as nonfatal work injuries and illnesses to the self-employed; to workers on farms with 10 or fewer employees; to private household workers; to volunteers; and to federal government workers.

Injuries and illnesses logged by employers conform to definitions and recordkeeping guidelines set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. Under OSHA guidelines, nonfatal cases are recordable if they are occupational injuries or illnesses which involve lost work time, medical treatment other than first aid, restriction of work or motion, loss of consciousness, or transfer to another job. Employers record injuries separate from illnesses and also identify for each whether a case involved any days away from work or days of restricted work activity, or both, beyond the day of injury or onset of illness.

Survey estimates are based on a scientifically selected sample of establishments, some of which represent only themselves, but most of which also represent other employers of like industry and workforce size that were not chosen to report data in a given survey year.

The incidence rates presented in this release represent the number of injuries and/or illnesses per 100 full-time equivalent workers and were calculated as:

     (N / EH) X 200,000 where,

     N = number of injuries and/or illnesses

     EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year

     200,000 = base for 100 full-time equivalent workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year)

Background and methodological information regarding the BLS occupational safety and health statistics program can be found in Chapter 9 of the BLS Handbook of Methods at www.bls.gov/opub/hom/homch9.htm.

Additional occupational injury and illness data are available from our regional web page at www.bls.gov/regions/southeast/. Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-691-5200; Federal Relay Service: 800-877-8339.


Table 1. Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and case type, South Carolina, 2016
Industry(1)(2)(3)Total recordable casesCases with days away from work, job transfer, or restrictionOther recordable cases
TotalCases with days away from work(4)Cases with job transfer or restriction

All industries including state and local government

2.81.50.80.71.3

Private industry

2.51.40.70.71.1

Goods-producing

2.71.70.90.91.0

Natural resources and mining

3.93.32.60.70.6

Construction

2.41.41.00.40.9

Manufacturing

2.81.80.81.01.0

Service-providing

2.41.30.70.61.1

Trade, transportation, and utilities

2.81.80.81.01.0

Information

1.40.50.30.30.9

Financial activities

0.70.30.3(5)0.4

Professional and business services

1.20.80.50.40.4

Education and health services

3.21.30.60.71.9

Leisure and hospitality

3.11.51.10.41.6

Other services, except public administration

1.80.70.50.21.1

State and local government

4.42.01.20.92.4

State government

3.11.51.00.51.7

Local government

4.92.21.21.02.7

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System, 2012 edition) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.
(5) Data do not meet publication guidelines.
 

Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where: N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).
 


Table 2. Numbers of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by selected industries and case types, South Carolina, 2016 (numbers in thousands)
Industry(1)(2)(3)Total recordable casesCases with days away from work, job transfer, or restrictionOther recordable cases
TotalCases with days away from work(4)Cases with job transfer or restriction

All industries including state and local government

43.723.712.810.920.0

Private industry

32.818.79.98.814.1

Goods-producing

9.46.03.13.03.4

Natural resources and mining

0.50.40.30.10.1

Construction

2.11.30.90.40.8

Manufacturing

6.84.31.92.52.5

Service-providing

23.412.76.85.810.8

Trade, transportation, and utilities

9.35.92.73.23.3

Information

0.30.10.10.10.2

Financial activities

0.60.30.2(5)0.4

Professional and business services

2.21.50.80.70.7

Education and health services

5.42.21.11.13.2

Leisure and hospitality

4.92.31.70.62.5

Other services, except public administration

0.70.30.20.10.4

State and local government

10.95.02.92.15.9

State government

2.31.10.70.41.2

Local government

8.63.92.11.84.7

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System, 2012 edition) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.
(5) Data do not meet publication guidelines.
 


Table 3. Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and employment size, South Carolina, 2016
Industry(1)(2)(3)All establishmentsEstablishment employment size (workers)
1 to 1011 to 4950 to 249250 to 9991,000 or more

All industries including state and local government

2.81.51.93.53.13.5

Private industry

2.51.41.83.42.82.6

Goods-producing

2.7-2.92.92.43.2

Natural resources and mining

3.9-2.02.97.8-

Construction

2.4-3.22.11.2-

Manufacturing

2.8-2.73.12.43.3

Service-providing

2.41.41.63.53.12.2

Trade, transportation, and utilities

2.81.41.84.13.9-

Information

1.4(4)-3.21.6-

Financial activities

0.7--1.80.4-

Professional and business services

1.2-1.01.61.70.7

Education and health services

3.2-1.63.94.93.6

Leisure and hospitality

3.1-2.04.34.8-

Other services, except public administration

1.8-2.44.12.5-

State and local government

4.4-4.04.04.44.5

State government

3.1-5.02.93.32.3

Local government

4.9-3.44.45.25.4

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System, 2012 edition) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Data do not meet publication guidelines.
 

Note: Dashes indicate data not available.
Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where: N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).
 


Table 4. Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses by industry sector and selected case type with measures of statistical significance, South Carolina, 2015–16
Industry(1)(2)(3)Total recordable casesCases with days away from work, job transfer, or restriction (4)
2015201620152016

All industries including state and local government

2.92.81.51.5

Private industry

2.52.51.41.4

Goods-producing

3.02.71.91.7

Natural resources and mining

3.23.93.03.3

Construction

2.32.41.81.4

Manufacturing

3.12.81.91.8

Service-providing

2.42.41.21.3

Trade, transportation, and utilities

2.82.81.61.8

Information

1.91.41.20.5

Financial activities

0.90.70.60.3

Professional and business services

1.31.20.70.8

Education and health services

3.73.21.71.3

Leisure and hospitality

2.63.10.81.5*

Other services, except public administration

-1.8-0.7

State and local government

4.74.42.22.0

State government

3.93.12.01.5

Local government

5.04.92.32.2

Footnotes:
(1) Excludes farms with fewer than 11 employees.
(2) Data for mining (Sector 21 in the North American Industry Classification System, 2012 edition) include establishments not governed by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) rules and reporting, such as those in oil and gas extraction and related support activities. Data for mining operators in coal, metal, and nonmetal mining are provided to BLS by the Mine Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. Independent mining contractors are excluded from the coal, metal, and nonmetal mining industries. These data do not reflect the changes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration made to its recordkeeping requirements effective January 1, 2002; therefore estimates for these industries are not comparable to estimates in other industries.
(3) Data for employers in rail transportation are provided to BLS by the Federal Railroad Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation.
(4) Days-away-from-work cases include those that result in days away from work with or without job transfer or restriction.
 

Note: Dashes indicate data not available.
Incidence rates represent the number of injuries and illnesses per 100 full-time workers and were calculated as: (N/EH) x 200,000 where: N = number of injuries and illnesses; EH = total hours worked by all employees during the calendar year; and 200,000 = base for 100 equivalent full-time workers (working 40 hours per week, 50 weeks per year).
* An asterisk indicates a significant difference between the current year and prior year values, when testing at 95% confidence level.
 

 

Last Modified Date: Tuesday, January 30, 2018