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EMPLOYMENT & UNEMPLOYMENT   •  Jan 2022  •  Volume 11 / Number 1

How did employment change during the COVID-19 pandemic? Evidence from a new BLS survey supplement

How did employment change during the COVID-19 pandemic? Evidence from a new BLS survey supplement

In an effort to understand how the COVID-19 pandemic affected labor market experience, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) fielded a short supplemental survey to gather information from its sample members on work and working conditions, among other topics.

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PRICES & SPENDING

How did the COVID-19 pandemic affect input costs for U.S. producers? A review based on BLS input cost indexes

This Beyond the Numbers article will define satellite net input to industry Indexes and use data from December 2018 through April 2021 to examine shifts in input costs for both goods and services consumed by domestic producers. Satellite net input indexes measure the average change in prices industries pay for inputs, including imports, but exclude capital investments and labor.
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EMPLOYMENT & UNEMPLOYMENT

Job openings and labor turnover trends for States in 2020

Data from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) highlight the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on state labor markets. While all states were affected, each state was confronted with its own unique job opening and turnover challenges, and the path taken towards a new normal was not the same for every state.
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PRICES & SPENDING

Measuring consumer price change during economic downturns: a review of assumptions about consumer spending

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) publishes a wide variety of measures of consumer price change, each with different market baskets that are used to calculate average price change across items and cities. The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a weighted average of price change for a market basket of consumer goods and services. One measure of price change is the CPI All Urban Consumers (CPI-U). This measure is what most media outlets refer to as consumer inflation. The CPI-U is published in a timely manner, less than 2 weeks after the reference month, but the market basket is based on consumer spending from 2017–2018 for January 2020 to December 2021 indexes.
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