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EMPLOYMENT & UNEMPLOYMENT   •  Feb 2023  •  Volume 12 / Number 3
Comparing occupational employment and wages in public and private elementary and secondary schools

Comparing occupational employment and wages in public and private elementary and secondary schools

This Beyond the Numbers article uses ownership data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program to look at differences in occupational composition and wages between local government and private elementary and secondary schools.

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Recent articles
PRICES & SPENDING

Getting less for the same price? Explore how the CPI measures “shrinkflation” and its impact on inflation

This Beyond the Numbers article examines product upsizing and downsizing and explores how these concepts affect measurements in the CPI. Read on to find out more about how the CPI captures these changes, which types of products experienced the most change between 2015-2021, and its impact on inflation.

PAY & BENEFITS

How do retirement plans for private industry and state and local government workers compare?

The National Compensation Survey (NCS) produces two annual publications that provide a rich amount of information on retirement plans. How retirement plans differ between private industry workers and state and local government workers is a major point of interest. What type of plans are offered to workers? Are plan characteristics different or basically the same?

EMPLOYMENT & UNEMPLOYMENT

Texas: job openings and labor turnover state spotlight

This Beyond the Numbers article will examine these labor market trends in Texas. Using JOLTS total nonfarm state estimates from December 2005 to December 2021, we compare Texas to states with similarly sized economies—California, Florida, and New York—as well as to the United States during the two most recent recessions.