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19-563-ATL
Tuesday, April 02, 2019

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County Employment and Wages in Florida – Third Quarter 2018

Employment increased in each of Florida’s 24 large counties from September 2017 to September 2018, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with 2017 average annual employment levels of 75,000 or more.) Regional Commissioner Janet S. Rankin noted that 3 counties in Florida ranked among the top 5 in the national ranking by percent increase in employment. (See table 1.)

Nationally, employment advanced 1.6 percent from September 2017 to September 2018 as 295 of the 349 largest U.S. counties registered increases. Midland, TX, had the largest over-the-year increase in employment with a gain of 11.9 percent. New Hanover, NC, had the largest over-the-year percentage decrease in employment with a loss of 2.0 percent.

Among the 24 largest counties in Florida, employment was highest in Miami-Dade (1,142,100) in September 2018, while Bay County had the smallest employment level (79,600). Together, Florida’s large counties accounted for 86.8 percent of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 349 largest counties made up 73.0 percent of total U.S. employment, which stood at 146.8 million in September 2018.

Each of Florida’s 24 large counties had over-the-year wage increases with the largest gain in Seminole County (5.9 percent). Hillsborough County had the highest average weekly wage among the state’s largest counties ($1,009), followed by Miami-Dade ($1,001). Nationally, the average weekly wage increased to $1,055, a 3.3 percent increase over the year. (See table 1.)

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 43 counties in Florida with 2017 average annual employment levels below 75,000. Average weekly wages in these counties ranged from $827 to $588. (See table 2.)

Large county wage changes

Among Florida’s 24 largest counties, average weekly wage increases in Seminole (5.9 percent, 13th) and Osceola (5.1 percent, 23rd) were in the top tenth of the national ranking. Average weekly wage growth in Florida’s other 22 large counties ranged from 3.9 to 1.3 percent.

Nationally, 336 of the 349 largest counties had over-the-year increases in average weekly wages in the third quarter of 2018. Chatham, GA, had the largest over-the-year wage gain at 8.5 percent, followed by King, WA (7.9 percent).

Of the 349 largest U.S. counties, 11 had over-the-year decreases in average weekly wages. Elkhart, IN, had the largest percentage decrease in average weekly wages (-4.2 percent), followed by Union, NJ (-3.7 percent).

Large county average weekly wages

Average weekly wages in five of Florida’s large counties placed in the top half of the national ranking in the third quarter of 2018. However, no large county in Florida had an average weekly wage above the national average of $1,055. (See table 1.)

Nationally, 94 large counties had average weekly wages above the U.S. average of $1,055 in the third quarter of 2018. Santa Clara, CA, had the highest average weekly wage at $2,460, followed by San Mateo, CA ($2,363), and San Francisco, CA ($2,097).

Among the largest U.S. counties, 255 had weekly wages below the national average in the third quarter of 2018. Cameron, TX, had the lowest wage ($632), followed by Horry, SC ($635), and Hidalgo, TX ($662).

Average weekly wages in Florida’s smaller counties

All 43 counties in Florida with employment below 75,000 had average weekly wages lower than the national average of $1,055. Among these counties, St. Johns had the highest average weekly wage at $827. Holmes County reported the lowest weekly wage among all counties in the state, averaging $588 in the third quarter of 2018. (See table 2.)

When all 67 counties in Florida were considered, 9 had average weekly wages below $650, 30 had wages from $650-$749, 15 had wages from $750-$849, 8 had wages from $850 to $949, and 5 had wages above $950. (See chart 1.)

Additional statistics and other information

Quarterly data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2017 edition of this publication contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2018 version of the national news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2017 are now available online at www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn17.htm. The 2018 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available in September 2019.

The County Employment and Wages release for fourth quarter 2018 is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, May 22, 2019. The County Employment and Wages full data update for fourth quarter 2018 is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, June 5, 2019.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States and the 24 largest counties in Florida, third quarter 2018
Area Employment Average weekly wage (1)
September 2018 (thousands) Percent change, September 2017-18 (2) National ranking by percent change (3) Average weekly wage National ranking by level (3) Percent change, third quarter 2017-18 (2) National ranking by percent change (3)

United States (4)

146,824.1 1.6 -- $1,055 -- 3.3 --

Florida

8,690.7 4.6 -- 924 29 3.1 25

Alachua, Fla.

132.7 2.3 72 911 223 3.4 122

Bay, Fla.

79.6 2.6 62 757 336 3.7 95

Brevard, Fla.

215.6 6.6 4 938 191 3.9 73

Broward, Fla.

811.3 3.9 22 966 172 3.0 163

Collier, Fla.

142.6 10.5 2 884 254 2.9 169

Duval, Fla.

515.6 3.4 38 976 165 2.5 215

Escambia, Fla.

136.0 2.3 72 820 313 2.2 259

Hillsborough, Fla.

685.5 3.5 33 1,009 132 3.3 128

Lake, Fla.

99.0 5.0 9 717 343 3.3 128

Lee, Fla.

258.6 7.8 3 824 311 1.9 280

Leon, Fla.

151.6 3.5 33 863 275 1.3 312

Manatee, Fla.

122.0 4.9 12 804 324 1.5 304

Marion, Fla.

103.1 3.6 30 711 344 2.3 241

Miami-Dade, Fla.

1,142.1 3.9 22 1,001 138 1.8 283

Okaloosa, Fla.

84.2 1.1 168 843 292 3.2 141

Orange, Fla.

850.5 4.6 15 931 194 3.9 73

Osceola, Fla.

95.3 4.9 12 707 345 5.1 23

Palm Beach, Fla.

599.1 4.0 20 986 155 3.6 101

Pasco, Fla.

121.2 5.2 8 728 341 2.0 272

Pinellas, Fla.

434.0 3.5 33 902 234 2.5 215

Polk, Fla.

221.5 5.0 9 801 325 3.0 163

Sarasota, Fla.

168.7 4.3 18 866 273 2.7 196

Seminole, Fla.

195.5 5.0 9 916 212 5.9 13

Volusia, Fla.

174.0 4.3 18 744 339 3.6 101

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Ranking does not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.


 Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in Florida, third quarter 2018
Area Employment September 2018 Average Weekly Wage(1)

United States(2)

146,824,093 $1,055

Florida

8,690,689 924

Alachua

132,701 911

Baker

7,730 635

Bay

79,612 757

Bradford

6,679 711

Brevard

215,583 938

Broward

811,306 966

Calhoun

2,914 606

Charlotte

46,788 730

Citrus

32,571 703

Clay

52,768 723

Collier

142,644 884

Columbia

24,234 714

De Soto

8,799 666

Dixie

2,764 746

Duval

515,555 976

Escambia

136,029 820

Flagler

23,499 653

Franklin

3,408 590

Gadsden

13,914 697

Gilchrist

3,482 618

Glades

1,727 767

Gulf

3,757 671

Hamilton

3,104 802

Hardee

6,540 697

Hendry

11,499 705

Hernando

44,098 696

Highlands

27,147 664

Hillsborough

685,464 1,009

Holmes

3,397 588

Indian River

51,675 777

Jackson

14,810 670

Jefferson

2,534 641

Lafayette

1,296 619

Lake

98,976 717

Lee

258,558 824

Leon

151,640 863

Levy

8,937 610

Liberty

1,885 733

Madison

4,363 613

Manatee

122,011 804

Marion

103,118 711

Martin

67,517 776

Miami-Dade

1,142,066 1,001

Monroe

39,178 802

Nassau

23,130 766

Okaloosa

84,214 843

Okeechobee

11,381 687

Orange

850,532 931

Osceola

95,288 707

Palm Beach

599,135 986

Pasco

121,190 728

Pinellas

434,016 902

Polk

221,460 801

Putnam

16,429 711

St. Johns

76,857 827

St. Lucie

77,256 778

Santa Rosa

38,768 694

Sarasota

168,695 866

Seminole

195,450 916

Sumter

29,563 775

Suwannee

11,439 662

Taylor

6,553 739

Union

3,385 744

Volusia

173,950 744

Wakulla

5,805 680

Walton

26,296 730

Washington

6,087 665

Footnotes
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

NOTE: Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.


Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, third quarter 2018
State Employment Average weekly wage (1)
September 2018 (thousands) Percent change, September 2017-18 Average weekly wage National ranking by level Percent change, third quarter 2017-18 National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

146,824.1 1.6 $1,055 -- 3.3 --

Alabama

1,966.0 1.2 885 38 3.1 25

Alaska

334.0 -0.4 1,065 13 3.7 12

Arizona

2,838.6 2.8 974 23 2.9 31

Arkansas

1,222.1 0.7 811 49 2.9 31

California

17,457.5 1.8 1,260 5 3.8 9

Colorado

2,684.0 2.1 1,104 9 3.5 18

Connecticut

1,681.5 0.3 1,209 6 2.5 41

Delaware

447.8 0.6 1,046 15 2.4 42

District of Columbia

770.7 0.7 1,807 1 2.8 36

Florida

8,690.7 4.6 924 29 3.1 25

Georgia

4,448.8 2.3 993 20 3.3 21

Hawaii

654.7 0.0 975 22 2.4 42

Idaho

743.5 3.0 805 50 3.2 23

Illinois

6,029.2 0.8 1,087 10 3.0 28

Indiana

3,072.3 0.9 883 39 2.4 42

Iowa

1,555.0 0.6 887 37 3.7 12

Kansas

1,390.4 1.0 867 42 3.5 18

Kentucky

1,898.7 0.5 855 43 2.2 47

Louisiana

1,915.4 0.5 901 33 3.7 12

Maine

626.5 0.6 851 45 3.7 12

Maryland

2,683.9 0.7 1,130 8 2.4 42

Massachusetts

3,598.1 0.7 1,305 2 3.2 23

Michigan

4,366.5 0.8 991 21 2.8 36

Minnesota

2,904.3 0.8 1,074 12 4.2 5

Mississippi

1,133.7 0.2 754 51 3.4 20

Missouri

2,812.0 0.4 907 31 3.3 21

Montana

473.3 1.0 815 48 2.8 36

Nebraska

980.3 0.6 873 41 2.8 36

Nevada

1,382.9 3.4 936 28 2.4 42

New Hampshire

662.3 0.5 1,040 16 1.7 49

New Jersey

4,072.6 0.8 1,181 7 2.1 48

New Mexico

826.2 1.2 855 43 3.9 7

New York

9,467.5 1.4 1,272 4 4.2 5

North Carolina

4,398.0 1.1 938 26 3.8 9

North Dakota

424.3 1.1 995 19 4.4 3

Ohio

5,424.4 0.7 947 25 2.9 31

Oklahoma

1,616.8 1.2 874 40 3.6 16

Oregon

1,939.8 1.5 1,005 18 3.8 9

Pennsylvania

5,894.8 1.0 1,031 17 3.0 28

Rhode Island

489.4 1.0 963 24 -1.3 51

South Carolina

2,088.2 2.8 834 46 0.8 50

South Dakota

431.5 1.3 827 47 3.0 28

Tennessee

3,005.6 1.7 938 26 3.9 7

Texas

12,327.0 2.6 1,064 14 3.1 25

Utah

1,494.4 3.4 911 30 3.6 16

Vermont

310.9 0.0 892 36 2.6 40

Virginia

3,889.6 1.1 1,082 11 2.9 31

Washington

3,425.6 2.4 1,280 3 6.2 2

West Virginia

706.0 1.7 894 35 8.1 1

Wisconsin

2,888.9 0.7 901 33 2.9 31

Wyoming

278.2 0.6 905 32 4.3 4

Puerto Rico

862.5 0.2 534 (3) 5.3 (3)

Virgin Islands

33.4 -8.0 888 (3) 18.6 (3)

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.

 

Last Modified Date: Tuesday, April 02, 2019