Department of Labor Logo United States Department of Labor
Dot gov

The .gov means it's official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you're on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

News Release Information

17-483-NEW
Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Contacts

Technical information:
Media contact:
  • (646) 264-3620

County Employment and Wages in Puerto Rico — Third Quarter 2016

Puerto Rico’s only large county, the municipio of San Juan, reported an employment decrease of 1.4 percent from September 2015 to September 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with employment of 75,000 or more as measured by 2015 annual average employment.) Chief Regional Economist Martin Kohli noted that in September 2016, San Juan’s employment level of 244,976 accounted for 27.6 percent of total employment in the commonwealth.

In the United States, employment grew 1.7 percent over the year, as 307 of the 344 largest U.S. counties gained jobs. (See table 1 and chart 1.) The 344 largest counties made up 72.5 percent of total U.S. employment.

The average weekly wage in San Juan was $634 in the third quarter of 2016, a 2.8-percent increase from a year ago. By comparison, the U.S. weekly wage increased 5.4 percent over the year to $1,027. (See table 1 and chart 2.)

 

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 77 municipios in Puerto Rico with employment below 75,000. All 77 had wages below the U.S. average of $1,027. (See table 2.) Juncos, located on the eastern part of the island, had the highest average weekly wage, $891. Guaynabo, located on the northern part of the island, was the only other small municipio with an average weekly wage above $600. Thirty-two municipios had average weekly wages below $400, with roughly half of these low-wage municipios located in the western end of the island, including Lajas ($325) and Las Marias ($313). (See chart 3.)

In the neighboring Virgin Islands, average weekly wages were also below the U.S. average. The highest average weekly wage among the three Virgin Island counties was $802 in St. Croix. Average weekly wages on St. Thomas and St. John were $771 and $698, respectively.

Though employment on each island was below 25,000, more than half of the Virgin Island’s 37,443 jobs in September 2016 were on St. Thomas, and an additional 14,265 were on St. Croix.

Additional statistics and other information

QCEW data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2015 edition of this publication contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2016 version of the national news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online are now available at www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn15.htm. The 2016 edition of Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online will be available in September 2017.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

The County Employment and Wages release for fourth quarter 2016 is scheduled to be released on Wednesday, June 7, 2017.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.8 million employer reports cover 142.9 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States, Puerto Rico, and San Juan, third quarter 2016
AreaEmploymentAverage weekly wage (1)
September 2016 (thousands)Percent change, September 2015-16 (2)Average weekly wagePercent change, third quarter 2015-16 (2)

United States (3)

142,940.51.7$1,0275.4

Puerto Rico

888.2-0.45242.3

San Juan

245.0-1.46342.8

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in Puerto Rico, third quarter 2016
AreaEmployment September 2016Average weekly wage (1)

United States (2)

142,940,452$1,027

  Puerto Rico

888,207524

    Adjuntas

1,908349

    Aguada

4,110349

    Aguadilla

17,912592

    Aguas Buenas

1,782379

    Aibonito

5,555471

    Anasco

5,120523

    Arecibo

20,540492

    Arroyo

2,609500

    Barceloneta

9,738509

    Barranquitas

3,049412

    Bayamon

55,122465

    Cabo Rojo

5,959339

    Caguas

45,530477

    Camuy

3,503370

    Canovanas

5,546451

    Carolina

45,710497

    Catano

10,429591

    Cayey

9,686512

    Ceiba

1,119404

    Ciales

1,572356

    Cidra

5,934494

    Coamo

3,713386

    Comerio

2,038367

    Corozal

3,896376

    Culebra

460330

    Dorado

8,356490

    Fajardo

11,384474

    Florida

1,132374

    Guanica

2,554369

    Guayama

10,891511

    Guayanilla

2,250420

    Guaynabo

46,121639

    Gurabo

6,493513

    Hatillo

8,083366

    Hormigueros

2,437338

    Humacao

16,279546

    Isabela

6,553454

    Jayuya

2,822517

    Juana Diaz

6,352447

    Juncos

6,631891

    Lajas

3,074325

    Lares

3,721333

    Las Marias

1,322313

    Las Piedras

6,962572

    Loiza

1,483370

    Luquillo

1,957403

    Manati

13,866538

    Maricao

1,254430

    Maunabo

1,295557

    Mayaguez

30,670461

    Moca

4,183349

    Morovis

2,267370

    Naguabo

2,190386

    Naranjito

2,926393

    Orocovis

3,103356

    Patillas

1,647389

    Penuelas

2,740398

    Ponce

47,539454

    Quebradillas

2,194351

    Rincon

1,769358

    Rio Grande

5,889449

    Sabana Grande

3,136353

    Salinas

3,479467

    San German

9,389424

    San Juan

244,976634

    San Lorenzo

4,728473

    San Sebastian

5,252338

    Santa Isabel

5,320420

    Toa Alta

3,532408

    Toa Baja

12,754452

    Trujillo Alto

10,354338

    Utuado

3,873417

    Vega Alta

4,509412

    Vega Baja

7,922501

    Vieques

1,846405

    Villalba

3,377567

    Yabucoa

2,884370

    Yauco

5,942389

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
 

Note: Includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.
 

Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, third quarter 2016
StateEmploymentAverage weekly wage (1)
September 2016 (thousands)Percent change, September 2015-16Average weekly wageNational ranking by levelPercent change, third quarter 2015-16National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

142,940.51.7$1,027--5.4--

Alabama

1,923.81.5870364.938

Alaska

337.4-2.61,055121.249

Arizona

2,695.53.1950246.95

Arkansas

1,205.41.0794485.232

California

16,871.12.41,21046.78

Colorado

2,576.52.61,062105.623

Connecticut

1,674.20.31,20455.034

Delaware

440.70.81,022165.623

District of Columbia

759.21.71,72813.845

Florida

8,320.23.7905296.214

Georgia

4,290.42.9969215.918

Hawaii

648.41.8956236.78

Idaho

703.73.5782506.312

Illinois

5,933.60.61,062104.440

Indiana

3,025.91.8866375.918

Iowa

1,548.60.8873356.214

Kansas

1,377.20.5857395.918

Kentucky

1,880.21.5857396.510

Louisiana

1,908.8-0.9883322.948

Maine

616.20.9825455.918

Maryland

2,648.11.41,12485.330

Massachusetts

3,522.92.01,27726.87

Michigan

4,292.22.1976195.918

Minnesota

2,849.51.61,053136.411

Mississippi

1,126.90.7739514.739

Missouri

2,782.11.6888305.034

Montana

464.51.5792494.341

Nebraska

973.90.9857395.526

Nevada

1,300.73.89492510.11

New Hampshire

655.01.81,027157.92

New Jersey

4,000.01.81,17375.034

New Mexico

811.50.2830444.043

New York

9,216.61.61,22233.546

North Carolina

4,290.32.3909285.330

North Dakota

423.2-3.4964220.750

Ohio

5,347.31.1924265.427

Oklahoma

1,578.7-1.3854423.546

Oregon

1,866.52.6970205.232

Pennsylvania

5,776.71.01,013175.427

Rhode Island

481.10.8990187.63

South Carolina

2,008.62.5832435.623

South Dakota

424.21.1809477.04

Tennessee

2,918.82.5912275.427

Texas

11,830.71.31,042144.341

Utah

1,407.43.8881336.312

Vermont

309.90.5880346.214

Virginia

3,801.01.01,06395.034

Washington

3,278.93.01,18866.95

West Virginia

691.5-1.6816463.944

Wisconsin

2,850.11.0885316.214

Wyoming

274.8-4.7865380.051

Puerto Rico

888.2-0.4524(3)2.3(3)

Virgin Islands

37.41.4778(3)5.9(3)

Footnotes:
(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.
 

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.
 

 

Last Modified Date: Tuesday, April 25, 2017