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14-2237-DAL
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

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County Employment and Wages in Oklahoma – Second Quarter 2014

Employment rose in Oklahoma’s three large counties from June 2013 to June 2014, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. (Large counties are defined as those with employment of 75,000 or more as measured by 2013 annual average employment.) Regional Commissioner Stanley W. Suchman noted that Cleveland County had the largest increase, up 2.1 percent, followed by Tulsa (1.6 percent) and Oklahoma (1.0 percent). (See table 1.)

Employment nationwide advanced 2.0 percent during the 12-month period as 305 of the 339 largest U.S. counties registered increases. Weld, Colo., recorded the fastest employment gain in the country, up 8.9 percent. Atlantic, N.J. experienced the largest over-the-year decrease among these counties with a loss of 1.6 percent.

Among the three largest counties in Oklahoma, employment was highest in Oklahoma County (442,400) in June 2014. Tulsa and Cleveland Counties had employment levels of 342,900 and 78,400, respectively. Together, the three largest Oklahoma counties accounted for 54.7 percent of total employment within the state. Nationwide, the 339 largest counties made up 71.8 percent of total U.S. employment.

All three large Oklahoma counties experienced average weekly wage gains from the second quarter of 2013 to the second quarter of 2014. Tulsa County recorded the fastest rate of increase in average weekly wages, up 3.6 percent. (See table 1.) Tulsa County also had the highest average weekly wage among the state’s largest counties at $894, closely followed by Oklahoma County ($891). Nationally, the average weekly wage increased 2.1 percent from a year ago to $940 in the second quarter of 2014.

Employment and wage levels (but not over-the-year changes) are also available for the 74 counties in Oklahoma with employment below 75,000. In all but one of these smaller counties, wage levels were below the national average. (See table 2.)

Large county wage changes

Tulsa County’s 3.6-percent rise in average weekly wages from the second quarter of 2013 to the second quarter of 2014 ranked 32nd among the nation’s 339 largest counties and was well above the U.S. average rate of increase (2.1 percent). Advancing at a slower pace, wages in Oklahoma and Cleveland recorded over-the-year increases of 1.9 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively. (See table 1.)

Nationally, 312 of the 339 largest counties registered over-the-year wage increases. Midland, Texas, experienced the largest wage gain in the nation, up 9.0 percent. Douglas, Colo., had the second largest overall increase (8.8 percent), followed by Hillsborough, N.H. and Collier, Fla. (7.4 and 6.8 percent, respectively).

Nationwide, 22 of the largest counties registered wage declines during the period. Williamson, Texas, experienced the largest decrease in average weekly wages with a loss of 2.7 percent over the year. Westchester, N.Y., had the second largest wage decline (-1.6 percent), followed by Lake, Ind. (-1.4 percent), and Bibb, Ga. (-1.3 percent).

Large county average weekly wages

Weekly wages in the state’s three large counties were below the national average of $940 per week. In the second quarter of 2014, average wages in Tulsa County ($894) ranked 148th and Oklahoma County ($891) ranked 151st, both in the middle of the national ranking of the 339 largest counties. In contrast, wages in Cleveland County ($716) ranked among the lowest, at 319th. (See table 1.)

Nationwide, average weekly wages were higher than the U.S. average ($940) in 109 of the 339 largest counties. Santa Clara, Calif., held the top position among the highest-paid large counties with an average weekly wage of $1,886. San Mateo, Calif., was second with an average weekly wage of $1,740, followed by New York, N.Y. ($1,732).

Two-thirds of the largest U.S. counties (230) reported average weekly wages below the national average in the second quarter of 2014. The lowest wage was reported in Horry, S.C. ($548), followed by the Texas counties of Cameron ($585) and Hidalgo ($608). Wages in these lowest-ranked counties were less than one-third of the average weekly wage reported for the highest-ranked county, Santa Clara, Calif. ($1,886).

Average weekly wages in Oklahoma's smaller counties

Among the 74 smaller counties in Oklahoma – those with employment below 75,000 – Kingfisher ($979) was the sole county to report average weekly wages above the $940 national average. Including Kingfisher, three others – Woodward ($922), Beckham, and Washington (both at $898 per week) – were among the highest-paid smaller counties in the state. Cimarron County reported the lowest average weekly wage in the state with an average of $500 in the second quarter of 2014. (See table 2.)

When all 77 counties in Oklahoma were considered, 14 reported average wages under $600 per week, 27 registered wages from $600 to $699, 23 had wages from $700 to $799, 13 had wages of $800 or more. (See chart 1.) The higher-paying counties were concentrated around the larger metropolitan areas of Oklahoma City and Tulsa, as well as smaller cities including Elk City, Enid, and Woodward. The lower-paying counties, those with weekly wages under $600, were generally located in the eastern third of the state.

Additional statistics and other information

QCEW data for states have been included in this release in table 3. For additional information about quarterly employment and wages data, please read the Technical Note or visit www.bls.gov/cew.

Employment and Wages Annual Averages Online features comprehensive information by detailed industry on establishments, employment, and wages for the nation and all states. The 2013 edition of this publication contains selected data produced by Business Employment Dynamics (BED) on job gains and losses, as well as selected data from the first quarter 2014 version of the news release. Tables and additional content from Employment and Wages Annual Averages 2013 are now available online at www.bls.gov/cew/cewbultn13.htm.

Information in this release will be made available to sensory impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-691-5200; Federal Relay Service: 1-800-877-8339.


Technical Note

Average weekly wage data by county are compiled under the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) program, also known as the ES-202 program. The data are derived from summaries of employment and total pay of workers covered by state and federal unemployment insurance (UI) legislation and provided by State Workforce Agencies (SWAs). The 9.4 million employer reports cover 137.8 million full- and part-time workers. The average weekly wage values are calculated by dividing quarterly total wages by the average of the three monthly employment levels of those covered by UI programs. The result is then divided by 13, the number of weeks in a quarter. It is to be noted, therefore, that over-the-year wage changes for geographic areas may reflect shifts in the composition of employment by industry, occupation, and such other factors as hours of work. Thus, wages may vary among counties, metropolitan areas, or states for reasons other than changes in the average wage level. Data for all states, Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), counties, and the nation are available on the BLS Web site at www.bls.gov/cew/; however, data in QCEW press releases have been revised (see Technical Note below) and may not match the data contained on the Bureau’s Web site.

QCEW data are not designed as a time series. QCEW data are simply the sums of individual establishment records reflecting the number of establishments that exist in a county or industry at a point in time. Establishments can move in or out of a county or industry for a number of reasons–some reflecting economic events, others reflecting administrative changes.

The preliminary QCEW data presented in this release may differ from data released by the individual states as well as from the data presented on the BLS Web site. These potential differences result from the states’ continuing receipt, review and editing of UI data over time. On the other hand, differences between data in this release and the data found on the BLS Web site are the result of adjustments made to improve over-the-year comparisons. Specifically, these adjustments account for administrative (noneconomic) changes such as a correction to a previously reported location or industry classification. Adjusting for these administrative changes allows users to more accurately assess changes of an economic nature (such as a firm moving from one county to another or changing its primary economic activity) over a 12-month period. Currently, adjusted data are available only from BLS press releases.

Table 1. Covered employment and wages in the United States and the 3 largest counties in Oklahoma, second quarter 2014
AreaEmploymentAverage Weekly Wage (1)
June 2014 (thousands)Percent change, June 2013-14 (2)National ranking by percent change (3)Average weekly wageNational ranking by level (3)Percent change, second quarter 2013-14 (2)National ranking by percent change (3)

United States (4)

137,776.402.0--$940--2.1--

Oklahoma

1,578.001.0--816332.612

Cleveland, Okla.

78.42.11297163191.8167

Oklahoma, Okla.

442.41.02448911511.9156

Tulsa, Okla.

342.91.61778941483.632

(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Percent changes were computed from quarterly employment and pay data adjusted for noneconomic county reclassifications.
(3) Ranking does not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(4) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.


Table 2. Covered employment and wages in the United States and all counties in Oklahoma, second quarter 2014
AreaEmployment
June
2014
Average
Weekly
Wage (1)

United States (2)

137,776,364$940

Oklahoma

1,577,969816

Adair

4,656606

Alfalfa

1,731810

Atoka

3,172587

Beaver

1,868732

Beckham

11,785898

Blaine

3,138702

Bryan

14,865657

Caddo

6,707692

Canadian

31,727774

Carter

23,815775

Cherokee

15,411640

Choctaw

4,151567

Cimarron

706500

Cleveland

78,381716

Coal

1,102659

Comanche

42,551712

Cotton

1,461584

Craig

5,490635

Creek

18,831752

Custer

13,361759

Delaware

8,893566

Dewey

1,499774

Ellis

1,312797

Garfield

26,995857

Garvin

9,716850

Grady

12,584714

Grant

1,438874

Greer

1,264599

Harmon

710596

Harper

1,239657

Haskell

3,383550

Hughes

3,132602

Jackson

9,361660

Jefferson

1,049631

Johnston

2,551652

Kay

18,588730

Kingfisher

6,027979

Kiowa

2,167635

Latimer

3,328779

LeFlore

13,429670

Lincoln

6,758664

Logan

7,246639

Love

4,861628

Major

2,941808

Marshall

4,588639

Mayes

12,209769

McClain

8,410667

McCurtain

10,965614

McIntosh

3,948545

Murray

5,983656

Muskogee

29,185717

Noble

4,578759

Nowata

1,687570

Okfuskee

2,406589

Oklahoma

442,412891

Okmulgee

9,626635

Osage

6,776697

Ottawa

11,643581

Pawnee

3,194752

Payne

33,483767

Pittsburg

16,007773

Pontotoc

17,099707

Pottawatomie

22,374641

Pushmataha

2,773560

Roger Mills

755769

Rogers

27,757836

Seminole

7,223668

Sequoyah

9,189521

Stephens

15,866835

Texas

9,869689

Tillman

1,952627

Tulsa

342,907894

Wagoner

9,173675

Washington

21,407898

Washita

2,179710

Woods

3,850751

Woodward

10,684922

(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.

Note: Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs. Data are preliminary.


Table 3. Covered employment and wages by state, second quarter 2014
StateEmploymentAverage weekly wage (1)
June 2014 (thousands)Percent change, June 2013-14Average weekly wageNational ranking by levelPercent change, second quarter 2013-14National ranking by percent change

United States (2)

137776.42.0$940--2.1--

Alabama

1872.90.7806361.638

Alaska

344.90.51,01484.62

Arizona

2486.01.9888211.343

Arkansas

1168.11.5745471.541

California

15905.62.81,07262.415

Colorado

2439.33.4960142.98

Connecticut

1676.60.61,15532.513

Delaware

429.02.5976111.244

District of Columbia

732.61.01,5691-0.551

Florida

7628.63.1839282.123

Georgia

4036.33.1882221.735

Hawaii

624.61.1845262.710

Idaho

659.22.5697512.222

Illinois

5836.91.5988101.932

Indiana

2916.91.8784421.244

Iowa

1547.81.6780433.07

Kansas

1372.81.7797382.320

Kentucky

1820.81.7798372.027

Louisiana

1921.61.4843272.415

Maine

610.40.8746462.123

Maryland

2594.40.91,02071.638

Massachusetts

3407.01.41,15822.415

Michigan

4164.72.3897202.320

Minnesota

2782.01.3947161.932

Mississippi

1101.10.5705502.027

Missouri

2703.21.3818311.932

Montana

453.41.1734482.415

Nebraska

956.21.4756452.710

Nevada

1210.13.4833300.650

New Hampshire

637.21.2955154.33

New Jersey

3944.80.81,09751.244

New Mexico

801.00.6794401.735

New York

8965.21.81,14642.415

North Carolina

4080.72.4818311.244

North Dakota

453.04.4936175.51

Ohio

5233.81.4846252.123

Oklahoma

1578.01.0816332.612

Oregon

1748.42.4874232.98

Pennsylvania

5719.81.0933181.638

Rhode Island

472.91.6898192.027

South Carolina

1916.42.7765442.513

South Dakota

422.91.4712493.34

Tennessee

2755.71.8836292.027

Texas

11402.83.0973133.15

Utah

1297.52.9796391.735

Vermont

307.01.0813350.749

Virginia

3710.80.7976110.848

Washington

3109.63.299092.123

West Virginia

711.3-0.3792411.442

Wisconsin

2809.11.3816332.027

Wyoming

295.31.6871243.15

Puerto Rico

897.0-2.0504(3)0.6(3)

Virgin Islands

37.8-2.2728(3)2.8(3)

(1) Average weekly wages were calculated using unrounded data.
(2) Totals for the United States do not include data for Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands.
(3) Data not included in the national ranking.

Note: Data are preliminary. Covered employment and wages includes workers covered by Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Unemployment Compensation for Federal Employees (UCFE) programs.


 

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, December 31, 2014