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Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers

Summary

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Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxgWjQrwBls.
Quick Facts: Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers
2020 Median Pay $55,350 per year
$26.61 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2020 48,300
Job Outlook, 2020-30 -5% (Decline)
Employment Change, 2020-30 -2,400

What Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers Do

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL (English as a Second Language) teachers instruct adults in fundamental skills, such as reading and speaking English. They also help students earn their high school equivalency credential.

Work Environment

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers are often employed by community colleges, community-based organizations, and public schools. Part-time work is common.

How to Become an Adult Basic or Secondary Education or ESL Teacher

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers who work in public schools must have at least a bachelor’s degree and a license or certification.

Pay

The median annual wage for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers was $55,350 in May 2020.

Job Outlook

Employment of adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers is projected to decline 5 percent from 2020 to 2030.

Despite declining employment, about 5,100 openings for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. All of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers Do About this section

adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers image
Adult education and ESL teachers use different teaching strategies to meet their students’ needs.

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL (English as a Second Language) teachers instruct adults in fundamental skills, such as reading, writing, and speaking English. They also help students earn their high school equivalency credential.

Duties

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers typically do the following:

  • Plan and teach lessons to help students gain the knowledge and skills needed to earn their high school equivalency credential
  • Adapt teaching methods based on students’ strengths and weaknesses
  • Emphasize skills that will help students find jobs, such as learning English words and common phrases used in the workplace
  • Assess students for learning disabilities
  • Monitor students’ progress
  • Help students develop study skills
  • Connect students to other resources in their community, such as job placement services

Students’ educational level and skills are assessed before they enter these programs. Teachers may conduct the assessments; however, sometimes another staff member assesses students. Based on the results of the assessment and the student’s goals, teachers develop an education plan.

Teachers must formally evaluate their students periodically to determine their progress and potential to go on to the next level of classes. However, teachers may informally evaluate their students’ progress continually.

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers often have students of various ability levels in their classes. As a result, these teachers need to use different strategies to meet the needs of all of their students. They may work with students in classes or teach them one-on-one.

There are three types of education that adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers provide:

Adult basic education (ABE) classes teach students the basics of reading, writing, and math. The students generally are age 16 or older and need to gain proficiency in these skills to improve their job situation. Teachers prepare students for further education and help them to develop skills that they will need in the workplace. For example, they may teach students how to write a resume.

Adult secondary education classes prepare students to take the test to earn a high school equivalency credential. Some programs are combined with career preparation programs so that students can earn a high school equivalency and a career-related credential at the same time.

The high school equivalency exam is composed of four subjects: language arts, math, science, and social studies. In addition to teaching these subjects, teachers also help their students improve their skills in communicating, critical thinking, and problem solving—skills they will need in preparing for further education and successful careers.

English as a Second Language (ESL), also called English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL), classes teach students to read, write, and speak English. Students in these classes are immigrants to the United States or those whose native language is not English. ESL teachers may have students from many different countries and cultures in their classroom. Because the ESL teacher and the students may not share a common native language, ESL teachers must be creative with their communication in the classroom.

ESL teachers often focus on helping their students with practical vocabulary for jobs and daily living. They also may focus on preparing their students to take the citizenship exam.

Work Environment About this section

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers
Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers often work in community colleges, community-based organizations, and public schools.

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers held about 48,300 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers were as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; state, local, and private 31%
Junior colleges; state, local, and private 26
Other schools and instruction; state, local, and private 9
Self-employed workers 8
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private 6

Students in adult education and ESL programs attend classes by choice. As a result, they are often highly motivated, which may make teaching them rewarding and satisfying.

Work Schedules

These teachers often work in the mornings and evenings, because classes are held at times when students are not at work. Part-time work is common.

How to Become an Adult Basic or Secondary Education or ESL Teacher About this section

Adult literacy and GED teachers
Working with students of different abilities and backgrounds can be difficult and teachers must respond with patience when students struggle with material.

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers who work in public schools must have at least a bachelor’s degree and a license or certification.

Education

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers in public schools must have at least a bachelor’s degree. Some community colleges may prefer to hire those with a master’s degree or graduate coursework in adult education or English as a Second Language (ESL).

Programs in adult education prepare prospective teachers to use effective strategies for adult learners, work with students from a variety of cultures and backgrounds, and teach adults with learning disabilities. Some programs allow these prospective teachers to specialize in adult basic education, secondary education, or ESL.

Prospective ESL teachers should take courses or training in linguistics and theories of how people learn second languages. Knowledge of a second language is not necessary to teach ESL, but it can be helpful.

Teacher education programs instruct prospective teachers in how to present information to students and how to work with students of varying abilities and backgrounds. Programs typically include an opportunity for student-teachers to work with a mentor and get experience in a classroom. For information about teacher preparation programs in your state, visit Teach.org.

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers may take professional development classes to improve their teaching skills and ensure that they keep up with research about teaching adults.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers who work in public schools must have a teaching certificate. Some states have certificates specifically for adult education. Other states require teachers to have a certificate in elementary or secondary education.

To obtain a license, adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers typically need a bachelor’s degree and must complete a student-teaching program. For more information, contact the director of adult education for your state. Contact information is available from the U.S. Department of Education.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers must collaborate with other teachers and program administrators. In addition, they must explain concepts in terms that students can understand.

Cultural sensitivity. Teachers work with students from a variety of cultural, educational, and economic backgrounds. They must be respectful of their students’ backgrounds and be understanding of their concerns.

Patience. Working with students of different abilities and backgrounds can be difficult. Teachers must be patient when students struggle to understand the material.

Resourcefulness. Teachers must be able to think on their feet and find ways to keep students engaged in learning. They may have to change their methods of instruction to address the different needs of their students.  

Pay About this section

Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers

Median annual wages, May 2020

Adult basic education, adult secondary education, and English as a Second Language instructors

$55,350

Total, all occupations

$41,950

Other teachers and instructors

$33,970

 

The median annual wage for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers was $55,350 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $32,120, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $95,630.

In May 2020, the median annual wages for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; state, local, and private $61,410
Junior colleges; state, local, and private 53,820
Other schools and instruction; state, local, and private 51,090
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private 50,720

Teachers often work in the mornings and evenings, because classes are held at times when students are not at work. Part-time work is common.

Job Outlook About this section

Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers

Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30

Other teachers and instructors

16%

Total, all occupations

8%

Adult basic education, adult secondary education, and English as a Second Language instructors

-5%

 

Employment of adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers is projected to decline 5 percent from 2020 to 2030.

Despite declining employment, about 5,100 openings for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. All of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to other occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

Enrollment in adult education and ESL programs has declined in recent years. At the same time, high school graduation rates have increased, reducing the number of adults seeking to obtain high school equivalency credentials. As these trends continue, the demand for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers may decline.

Changes in government funding for adult education and ESL programs also may impact the demand for these workers.

Employment projections data for adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers, 2020-30
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Adult basic education, adult secondary education, and English as a Second Language instructors

25-3011 48,300 45,900 -5 -2,400 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of adult basic and secondary education and ESL teachers.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2020 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Career and technical education teachers Career and Technical Education Teachers

Career and technical education teachers instruct students in various technical and vocational subjects, such as auto repair, healthcare, and culinary arts.

Bachelor's degree $59,140
High school teachers High School Teachers

High school teachers teach academic lessons and various skills that students will need to attend college and to enter the job market.

Bachelor's degree $62,870
Instructional coordinators Instructional Coordinators

Instructional coordinators oversee school curriculums and teaching standards. They develop instructional material, implement it, and assess its effectiveness.

Master's degree $66,970
Kindergarten and elementary school teachers Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers instruct young students in basic subjects in order to prepare them for future schooling.

Bachelor's degree $60,660
Librarians Librarians and Library Media Specialists

Librarians and library media specialists help people find information and conduct research for personal and professional use.

Master's degree $60,820
Middle school teachers Middle School Teachers

Middle school teachers educate students, typically in sixth through eighth grades.

Bachelor's degree $60,810
Postsecondary teachers Postsecondary Teachers

Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a variety of academic subjects beyond the high school level.

See How to Become One $80,560
School and Career Counselors School and Career Counselors and Advisors

School counselors help students develop academic and social skills. Career counselors and advisors help people choose a path to employment.

Master's degree $58,120
Social workers Social Workers

Social workers help people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives.

See How to Become One $51,760
Special education teachers Special Education Teachers

Special education teachers work with students who have a wide range of learning, mental, emotional, and physical disabilities.

Bachelor's degree $61,500
Teacher assistants Teacher Assistants

Teacher assistants work with a licensed teacher to give students additional attention and instruction.

Some college, no degree $28,900
Interpreters and translators Interpreters and Translators

Interpreters and translators convert information from one language into another language.

Bachelor's degree $52,330
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/adult-literacy-and-ged-teachers.htm (visited November 24, 2021).

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 8, 2021

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2020 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2020

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2020, which is the base year of the 2020-30 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2020-30

The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent.

Employment Change, 2020-30

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2020-30

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

2020 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950.