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News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists

Summary

news analysts, reporters, and journalists image
News analysts, reporters, and journalists keep the public updated about current events and noteworthy information.
Quick Facts: News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists
2020 Median Pay $49,300 per year
$23.70 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2020 46,700
Job Outlook, 2020-30 6% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2020-30 2,800

What News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists Do

News analysts, reporters, and journalists keep the public updated about current events and noteworthy information.

Work Environment

Most news analysts, reporters, and journalists work for newspaper, website, or magazine publishers or in television or radio broadcasting. Others are self-employed. Most work full time, and their schedules vary.

How to Become a News Analyst, Reporter, or Journalist

News analysts, reporters, and journalists typically enter the occupation with a bachelor’s degree in journalism or communications. Internship or work experience on a college newspaper, radio station, or television station also may be helpful.

Pay

The median annual wage for news analysts, reporters, and journalists was $49,300 in May 2020.

Job Outlook

Employment of news analysts, reporters, and journalists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 5,400 openings for news analysts, reporters, and journalists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for news analysts, reporters, and journalists.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of news analysts, reporters, and journalists with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about news analysts, reporters, and journalists by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists Do About this section

news analysts, reporters, and journalists image
Those who work in television and radio set up and conduct interviews, which can be broadcast live or recorded for future broadcasts.

News analysts, reporters, and journalists keep the public updated about current events and noteworthy information. They report international, national, and local news for newspapers, magazines, websites, television, and radio.

Duties

News analysts, reporters, and journalists typically do the following:

  • Research topics that an editor or news director has assigned to them
  • Develop relationships with experts and contacts who provide tips and leads on stories or articles
  • Interview people who have information, analysis, or opinions about a story or article
  • Analyze and interpret information to increase audience understanding of the news
  • Write stories or articles for newspapers, magazines, or websites and create scripts to be read on television or radio
  • Review stories or articles for accuracy, style, and grammar
  • Update stories or articles as new information becomes available
  • Investigate new story or article ideas and pitch ideas to editors

News analysts, reporters, and journalists often work for a particular type of media organization, such as a television or radio station, newspaper, or website.

Those who work in television and radio set up and conduct interviews, which can be broadcast live or recorded for future broadcasts. These workers often edit interviews and other recordings to create a cohesive story or report, and they write and record voiceovers to provide the audience with supplementary facts or context. They may create multiple versions of the same story or report for different broadcasts or media platforms.

News analysts, reporters, and journalists for print media conduct interviews and write stories or articles to be used in newspapers, magazines, and online publications. Because most newspapers and magazines have print and online versions, these workers’ content typically appears in both versions. As a result, they must stay up to date with developments related to a content item and update the online version with current information, if necessary.

Outlets are increasingly relying on multimedia journalists to publish content on a variety of platforms, such as a video content on the website of a daily newspaper. Multimedia journalists typically record, report, write, and edit their own stories or articles. They also gather the audio, video, or graphics that accompany their content.

News analysts, reporters, and journalists may need to maintain a social media presence. Many use social media to cover live events, provide additional information for readers and viewers, promote their stations and newscasts, and engage with their audiences.

Some workers, particularly those in large cities or large news organizations, cover a particular topic, such as sports, medicine, or politics. Those who work in small cities, towns, or organizations may be generalists and cover a wide range of subjects.

Some news analysts, reporters, and journalists are self-employed and accept freelance assignments from news organizations. Because freelancers are paid for individual stories or articles, they may work with many organizations and spend some of their time marketing their content and looking for their next assignment. Self-employed news analysts, reporters, and journalists also may publish news and videos on their own platforms.

The following are examples of types of news analysts, reporters, and journalists:

Columnists write articles offering an opinion or perspective about a particular subject. They submit a piece to a publication, often on a schedule, such as once per week. Their work may be published in a newspaper, magazine, or other outlet or self-published on the columnist’s website.

Correspondents report the news to a radio or television network from a remote location. Those who cover international events, called foreign correspondents, often live in another country and report about a specific region of the world.

News anchors lead television or radio shows that describe current events. Others are news commentators who analyze and interpret reports and offer opinions. They may come from fields outside of journalism and have expertise in a particular subject, such as finance, and are hired on a contract basis to provide their opinion on that subject.

These workers also may collaborate with editors, photographers, videographers, and other reporters and journalists when working on an article or story.

For information about workers with a background in this field who teach journalism or communications at colleges and universities, see the profile on postsecondary teachers.

Work Environment About this section

news analysts, reporters, and journalists image
News analysts, reporters, and journalists spend a lot of time in the field, conducting interviews and investigating stories or articles.

News analysts, reporters, and journalists held about 46,700 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of news analysts, reporters, and journalists were as follows:

Radio and television broadcasting 35%
Newspaper, periodical, book, and directory publishers 34
Other information services 11

News analysts, reporters, and journalists spend a lot of time in the field, conducting interviews and investigating stories or articles. Reporters spend some time in an office or newsroom, but they often travel to be on location for events or to meet contacts and file stories remotely.

Injuries and Illnesses

Working on news items about some topics or events, such as conflicts and natural disasters, may put news analysts, reporters, and journalists in dangerous situations. In addition, reporters often face pressure or stress when trying to meet a deadline or cover breaking news.

Work Schedules

Most news analysts, reporters, and journalists work full time, and their schedules vary. They may need to work additional hours or change their schedules in order to follow breaking news. Because news can happen at any time, they may need to work nights and weekends. They may also work nights and weekends to lead news programs or provide commentary.

How to Become a News Analyst, Reporter, or Journalist About this section

news analysts, reporters, and journalists image
News analysts, reporters, and journalists must be determined when pursuing stories or articles.

News analysts, reporters, and journalists typically enter the occupation with a bachelor’s degree in journalism or communications. Internship or work experience on a college newspaper, radio station, or television station also may be helpful.

Education

News analysts, reporters, and journalists typically need a bachelor’s degree in journalism, communications, or a related subject, such as English.

Bachelor’s degree programs in journalism and communications include courses in journalistic ethics and techniques for researching topics and conducting interviews. Some programs may require students to study liberal arts subjects, such as history and economics, to prepare for covering a range of topics. Students may further specialize in the type of journalism they wish to pursue, such as print or broadcast.

Journalism students may benefit from courses in multimedia design, coding, and programming to be able to develop content that includes video, audio, data, and graphics.

Other Experience

Employers generally prefer to hire candidates who have had an internship or have worked on school newspapers, radio stations, or TV stations. While attending college, students may seek multiple internships with different news organizations. Internships allow students to gain experience and develop samples of their writing or their on-air appearances.

News commentators who come from a field outside of journalism typically have expertise in areas on which they comment.

Advancement

After gaining experience, field reporters at a local news station may become that station’s anchor. News analysts, reporters, and journalists may also advance by moving from news organizations in small cities or towns to news organizations in large cities. Large markets may offer opportunities for more responsibility and challenges. Reporters and journalists also may become editors or news directors.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. News analysts, reporters, and journalists must be able to clearly convey information. Strong writing skills also are important.

Interpersonal skills. To develop contacts and conduct interviews, news analysts, reporters, and journalists must be able to build relationships. They also need to work well with other journalists, editors, and news directors.

Persistence. News analysts, reporters, and journalists must be determined when pursuing stories or articles. Investigating topics and gathering facts may be difficult, particularly when those involved refuse to be interviewed or to provide comment.

Stamina. The work of news analysts, reporters, and journalists is often fast paced and exhausting. They must be able to adapt to the irregular hours of work.

Technological skills. News analysts, reporters, and journalists should be able to use editing equipment and other broadcast-related devices. They also should be able to use multimedia and coding software in order to publish stories on websites and mobile devices.

Pay About this section

News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists

Median annual wages, May 2020

Media and communication workers

$61,310

News analysts, reporters, and journalists

$49,300

Total, all occupations

$41,950

 

The median annual wage for news analysts, reporters, and journalists was $49,300 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $25,510, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $127,370.

In May 2020, the median annual wages for news analysts, reporters, and journalists in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Other information services $73,300
Radio and television broadcasting 55,030
Newspaper, periodical, book, and directory publishers 37,900

Most news analysts, reporters, and journalists work full time, and schedules vary. They may need to work additional hours or change their schedules in order to follow breaking news. Because news can happen at any time, they may need to work nights and weekends. They may also work nights and weekends to lead news programs or provide commentary.

Job Outlook About this section

News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists

Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30

Media and communication workers

11%

Total, all occupations

8%

News analysts, reporters, and journalists

6%

 

Employment of news analysts, reporters, and journalists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2020 to 2030, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 5,400 openings for news analysts, reporters, and journalists are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

Much of the projected employment growth in this occupation is due to recovery from the COVID-19 recession that began in 2020. However, declining advertising revenue in radio, newspapers, and television is expected to impact the long-term demand for these workers.

Readership and circulation of newspapers are expected to continue to decline over the decade. In addition, television and radio stations are increasingly publishing content online and on mobile devices. As a result, news organizations may have difficulty selling traditional forms of advertising, which is often their primary source of revenue. Some organizations will likely continue to use new forms of advertising or offer paid subscriptions, but these innovations may not make up for lost print-ad revenues.

Declining revenue will force news organizations to downsize and employ fewer journalists. Increasing demand for online news may offset some of the downsizing. However, because online and mobile ad revenue is typically less than print revenue, the growth in digital advertising may not offset the decline in print advertising, circulation, and readership.

News organizations also continue to consolidate and increasingly share resources, staff, and content with other media outlets. For example, reporters working for a media outlet may gather and report news that is published in multiple newspapers owned by the same parent company. As consolidations, mergers, and news sharing continue, the demand for journalists may decrease. However, in some instances, consolidation helps limit the loss of jobs. Mergers may allow financially troubled newspapers, radio stations, and television stations to keep staff because of increased funding and resources from the larger organization.

Employment projections data for news analysts, reporters, and journalists, 2020-30
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2020 Projected Employment, 2030 Change, 2020-30 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

News analysts, reporters, and journalists

27-3023 46,700 49,500 6 2,800 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of news analysts, reporters, and journalists.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2020 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Atmospheric scientists, including meteorologists Atmospheric Scientists, Including Meteorologists

Atmospheric scientists study the weather and climate.

Bachelor's degree $99,740
Broadcast and sound engineering technicians Broadcast, Sound, and Video Technicians

Broadcast, sound, and video technicians set up, operate, and maintain the electrical equipment for media programs.

See How to Become One $50,000
Editors Editors

Editors plan, review, and revise content for publication.

Bachelor's degree $63,400
Film and video editors and camera operators Film and Video Editors and Camera Operators

Film and video editors and camera operators manipulate moving images that entertain or inform an audience.

Bachelor's degree $61,900
Photographers Photographers

Photographers use their technical expertise, creativity, and composition skills to produce and preserve images.

High school diploma or equivalent $41,280
Public relations managers and specialists Public Relations and Fundraising Managers

Public relations managers direct the creation of materials that will enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization.

Bachelor's degree $118,430
public relations specialists image Public Relations Specialists

Public relations specialists create and maintain a positive public image for the clients they represent.

Bachelor's degree $62,810
Technical writers Technical Writers

Technical writers prepare instruction manuals, how-to guides, journal articles, and other supporting documents to communicate complex and technical information more easily.

Bachelor's degree $74,650
Writers and authors Writers and Authors

Writers and authors develop written content for various types of media.

Bachelor's degree $67,120
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, News Analysts, Reporters, and Journalists,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/reporters-correspondents-and-broadcast-news-analysts.htm (visited November 15, 2021).

Last Modified Date: Thursday, September 9, 2021

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2020 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2020

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2020, which is the base year of the 2020-30 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2020-30

The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030. The average growth rate for all occupations is 8 percent.

Employment Change, 2020-30

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2020-30

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2020 to 2030.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2020 to 2030.

2020 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2020, the median annual wage for all workers was $41,950.