Department of Labor Logo United States Department of Labor
Dot gov

The .gov means it's official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you're on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Emergency management specialists

June 30, 2006

In November 2004, there were 10,880 emergency management specialists employed in the U.S.

Annual earnings of emergency management specialists, November 2004
[Chart data—TXT]

Top employers of emergency management specialists are local governments, State governments, general medical and surgical hospitals, power generation and supply services, and emergency and other relief services.

Emergency management specialists earned a median salary of $45,670 a year in 2004, with the middle 50 percent earning between $33,390 and $62,370. The highest earning 10 percent made more than $81,860, and the lowest earning 10 percent made less than $24,630.

Emergency management specialists can have different job titles and duties. But all of these workers are involved in mitigation, preparedness, response, or recovery activities. Their efforts are critical to homeland security because they help people, businesses, and communities to avoid and better react to crises.

These employment and earnings estimates are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program. To learn more, see "Careers in homeland security: Many jobs, one mission," by Elka Jones, Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Summer 2006.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, Emergency management specialists on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2006/jun/wk4/art05.htm (visited April 09, 2020).

OF INTEREST
spotlight

Recent editions of Spotlight on Statistics

triangle