95 percent of managers and 39 percent of service workers offered medical benefits in March 2017

July 27, 2017

Sixty-seven percent of private industry workers had access to employer-provided medical care benefits in March 2017. Having access means employers offered the benefit, regardless of whether employees chose to participate. Forty-nine percent of private industry workers participated in an employer-provided medical care plan in March 2017. That results in a take-up rate—the percentage of workers with access to a plan who participate in the plan—of 72 percent.

 

 

Medical care benefits access, participation, and take-up rates for workers in private industry, by occupation, March 2017
Occupation Access Participation Take-up rate

All workers

67% 49% 72%

Management, business, and financial

95 73 76

Professional and related

82 61 74

Service

39 23 61

Sales and related

54 37 69

Office and administrative support

74 53 71

Construction, extraction, farming, fishing, and forestry

65 54 83

Installation, maintenance, and repair

79 60 76

Production

81 62 76

Transportation and material moving

69 49 71

Workers in management, business, and financial occupations had the highest access rate to medical care benefits (95 percent) and the highest participation rate (73 percent). Workers in service occupations had the lowest access rate (39 percent) and participation rate (23 percent).

The medical care take-up rate for all workers in private industry was 72 percent in March 2017. The take-up rate was 83 percent for workers in construction, extraction, farming, fishing, and forestry occupations. The take-up rate was 76 percent for workers in management, business, and financial occupations; installation, maintenance, and repair occupations; and production occupations. Workers in service occupations had the lowest take-up rate, 61 percent.

One reason workers may choose not to participate in the medical care benefits available from their employers is cost. On average, private industry employers paid 79 percent of the costs for medical plan premiums for single coverage and 67 percent for family coverage. For workers in management, business, and financial occupations, employers paid 79 percent of the premium costs for single coverage and 70 percent for family coverage. For workers in service occupations, employers paid 77 percent of the premium costs for single coverage and 62 percent for family coverage.

 

 

Percentage of medical care premiums paid by private industry employers for single coverage and family coverage, by occupation of employees, March 2017
Occupation Single coverage Family coverage

All workers

79% 67%

Management, business, and financial

79 70

Professional and related

80 68

Service

77 62

Sales and related

77 64

Office and administrative support

78 65

Construction, extraction, farming, fishing, and forestry

79 68

Installation, maintenance, and repair

79 68

Production

79 73

Transportation and material moving

80 71

These data are from the National Compensation Survey — Benefits program. For more information, see “Employee Benefits in the United States — March 2017” (HTML) (PDF). For more information about terms related to employee benefits, see our glossary.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, 95 percent of managers and 39 percent of service workers offered medical benefits in March 2017 on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2017/95-percent-of-managers-and-39-percent-of-service-workers-offered-medical-benefits-in-march-2017.htm (visited August 18, 2017).

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