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News Release Information

19-2085-CHI
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

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Technical information:
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  • (312) 353-1138

Women’s Earnings In Wisconsin — 2018

In 2018, Wisconsin women who were full-time wage and salary workers had median usual weekly earnings of $795, or 80.7 percent of the $985 median usual weekly earnings of their male counterparts, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Assistant Commissioner for Regional Operations Charlene Peiffer noted that the 2018 women’s-to-men’s earnings ratio in Wisconsin fell from 2017, down 2.3 percentage points. Nationwide, women earned $789 per week or 81.1 percent of the $973 median for men. (See table 1. The earnings comparisons in this release are on a broad level and do not control for many factors that can be significant in explaining earnings differences, such as job skills and responsibilities, work experience, and specialization.)

In Wisconsin, the women’s-to-men’s earnings ratio has ranged from a low of 68.5 percent in 1997 to a high of 83.6 percent in 2011. (See chart 1. Data for the states began in 1997.)

Among the 50 states, median weekly earnings of women in full-time wage and salary positions in 2018 ranged from $637 in Mississippi to $995 in Massachusetts. In addition to Massachusetts, women’s earnings in Colorado, Connecticut, Maryland, Minnesota, and New Jersey were above $900 per week. In the District of Columbia, women earned a median weekly wage of $1,259. (See table 1 and chart 2.)

Median weekly earnings for men were lowest in Arkansas at $809 and highest in Massachusetts at $1,170. Five other states (Connecticut, Maryland, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Washington) had weekly wages above $1,100 for full-time male workers. In the District of Columbia, men earned a median weekly wage of $1,445.

California had the highest women’s-to-men’s earnings ratio among the states, 88.3 percent, and Wyoming had the lowest, 67.8 percent. The District of Columbia had a ratio of 87.1 percent. (See chart 3.) The differences among the states reflect, in part, variation in the occupations and industries found in each state and differences in the demographic composition of each state’s labor force. In addition, sampling error for state estimates is considerably larger than it is for the national estimates. Consequently, earnings comparisons between states should be made with caution.


Technical Note

The estimates in this release were obtained from the Current Population Survey (CPS), which provides information on the labor force, employment, and unemployment. The survey is conducted monthly for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) by the U.S. Census Bureau using a scientifically selected national sample of about 60,000 eligible households representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The survey data on earnings are based on one-fourth of the CPS monthly sample and are limited to wage and salary workers. All self-employed workers, both incorporated and unincorporated, are excluded from the data presented in this release.

Statistics based on the CPS data are subject to both sampling and nonsampling error. Further information about the reliability of data from the CPS is available on the CPS Technical Documentation page of the BLS website.

The principal concepts and definitions used in connection with the earnings data in this release are described briefly below.

Usual weekly earnings reflect earnings before taxes and other deductions and include any overtime pay, commissions, or tips usually received (at the main job in the case of multiple jobholders). Respondents are asked to identify the easiest way for them to report earnings (hourly, weekly, biweekly, twice monthly, monthly, annually, or other) and how much they usually earn in the reported time period. Earnings reported on a basis other than weekly are converted to a weekly equivalent. The term “usual” is determined by each respondent’s own understanding of the term.

The median of usual weekly earnings reflects the midpoint in a given earnings distribution, with half of workers having earnings above the median and the other half having earnings below the median.

Wage and salary workers are people age 16 and older who receive wages, salaries, commissions, tips, payments in kind, or piece rates on their sole or principal job. This group includes employees in both the public and private sectors. All self-employed workers are excluded whether or not their businesses are incorporated.

Full-time workers are defined for the purposes of these estimates as those who usually work 35 hours or more per week at their sole or principal job.

For more information on the median weekly earnings of women and men, see Bureau of Labor Statistics Report 1083, Highlights of women’s earnings in 2018, available at www.bls.gov/opub/reports/womens-earnings/2018/.           

Information in this release will be available to sensory impaired individuals upon request: (202) 691-5200; Federal Relay Service: (800) 877-8339.

Table 1. Median usual weekly earnings of full-time wage and salary workers by state, 2018 annual averages
State Total Women Men Women’s
earnings as a
percentage
of men’s
Number of
workers
(in thou-
sands)
Median
weekly
earnings
Standard
error of
median
Number of
workers
(in thou-
sands)
Median
weekly
earnings
Standard
error of
median
Number of
workers
(in thou-
sands)
Median
weekly
earnings
Standard
error of
median

United States

115,567 $886 $2 51,425 $789 $3 64,142 $973 $3 81.1

Alabama

1,658 805 18 749 688 23 910 922 23 74.6

Alaska

251 972 18 113 857 29 138 1,081 41 79.3

Arizona

2,404 826 12 1,062 762 17 1,342 910 26 83.7

Arkansas

991 739 13 462 681 16 529 809 22 84.2

California

13,536 934 9 5,800 876 12 7,736 992 12 88.3

Colorado

2,144 975 17 922 908 18 1,221 1,069 36 84.9

Connecticut

1,330 1,029 23 597 923 36 733 1,140 29 81.0

Delaware

366 882 20 174 789 28 192 982 13 80.3

District of Columbia

315 1,355 23 160 1,259 25 155 1,445 35 87.1

Florida

7,251 786 8 3,357 716 9 3,894 867 13 82.6

Georgia

3,812 831 15 1,749 744 15 2,063 919 21 81.0

Hawaii

497 889 16 234 797 23 263 965 31 82.6

Idaho

581 788 13 234 702 17 348 883 17 79.5

Illinois

4,606 943 12 2,049 831 16 2,557 1,069 21 77.7

Indiana

2,517 824 14 1,092 726 21 1,425 910 28 79.8

Iowa

1,172 858 14 523 753 17 649 977 27 77.1

Kansas

1,060 836 18 467 753 21 593 908 24 82.9

Kentucky

1,511 772 15 691 696 20 820 847 24 82.2

Louisiana

1,498 808 19 690 698 19 808 918 21 76.0

Maine

450 876 19 209 814 21 241 934 34 87.2

Maryland

2,353 1,042 30 1,085 950 39 1,268 1,147 35 82.8

Massachusetts

2,704 1,080 24 1,231 995 17 1,473 1,170 22 85.0

Michigan

3,436 902 11 1,483 811 17 1,952 987 17 82.2

Minnesota

2,083 1,022 18 948 937 32 1,135 1,096 43 85.5

Mississippi

965 734 13 458 637 19 506 831 23 76.7

Missouri

2,190 868 19 1,013 763 24 1,177 946 28 80.7

Montana

330 825 16 143 722 19 187 918 22 78.6

Nebraska

703 830 16 318 747 17 386 931 26 80.2

Nevada

1,154 775 11 501 720 13 653 827 16 87.1

New Hampshire

532 997 20 234 898 21 298 1,104 41 81.3

New Jersey

3,321 1,034 15 1,487 933 16 1,834 1,148 20 81.3

New Mexico

658 788 21 293 711 24 365 873 25 81.4

New York

6,994 928 10 3,230 849 10 3,764 993 14 85.5

North Carolina

3,679 815 11 1,700 739 13 1,979 885 13 83.5

North Dakota

283 889 17 122 749 16 161 1,013 24 73.9

Ohio

4,042 873 11 1,822 764 12 2,220 965 17 79.2

Oklahoma

1,338 828 15 579 712 17 760 946 19 75.3

Oregon

1,372 900 13 598 808 19 774 985 32 82.0

Pennsylvania

4,465 909 12 1,991 804 12 2,474 998 15 80.6

Rhode Island

389 942 29 181 781 28 208 1,088 32 71.8

South Carolina

1,692 822 18 773 739 13 919 922 21 80.2

South Dakota

312 803 11 143 731 11 169 884 14 82.7

Tennessee

2,357 792 16 1,051 719 14 1,306 894 21 80.4

Texas

10,168 824 9 4,362 739 8 5,806 918 13 80.5

Utah

1,036 879 13 394 729 15 641 1,016 18 71.8

Vermont

233 901 19 105 821 25 128 954 24 86.1

Virginia

3,276 948 15 1,464 851 21 1,812 1,069 35 79.6

Washington

2,685 1,019 20 1,114 860 29 1,571 1,140 21 75.4

West Virginia

575 771 15 259 662 16 316 879 24 75.3

Wisconsin

2,101 892 14 933 795 20 1,168 985 19 80.7

Wyoming

190 880 17 77 708 16 112 1,044 35 67.8

Note: In general, the sampling error for the state estimates is considerably larger than it is for the national estimates; thus, comparisons of state estimates should be made with caution. Data shown are based on workers’ state of residence; workers’ reported earnings, however, may or may not be from a job located in the same state.
Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, January 15, 2020