Department of Labor Logo United States Department of Labor
Dot gov

The .gov means it's official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you're on a federal government site.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Summary

Please enable javascript to play this video.

Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfL199nD-Ow.
Quick Facts: Tutors
2022 Median Pay $36,680 per year
Typical Entry-Level Education Some college, no degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2022 223,700
Job Outlook, 2022-32 3% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2022-32 7,400

What Tutors Do

Tutors instruct students individually or in small groups to support formal class instruction or improve academic performance. Some tutors prepare students for standardized tests.

Work Environment

Most tutors work part time, and their schedules may vary. For example, they may work evenings and weekends and may have more hours during the school year or leading up to standardized test dates.

How to Become a Tutor

Tutors typically need to have completed some college courses, specifically in subjects they want to teach. However, education requirements vary. Some employers do not require credentials; others prefer to hire tutors who have a bachelor's degree.

Pay

The median annual wage for tutors was $36,680 in May 2022.

Job Outlook

Employment of tutors is projected to grow 3 percent from 2022 to 2032, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 39,100 openings for tutors are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for tutors.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of tutors with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about tutors by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Tutors Do About this section

Tutors
Tutors review learning material with students.

Tutors instruct students individually or in small groups to support formal class instruction or improve academic performance. Some tutors prepare students for standardized or admissions tests.

Duties

Tutors typically do the following:

  • Set goals with students
  • Assist students with homework or practice problems
  • Teach students organizational and study skills
  • Provide feedback to students
  • Review learning materials with students
  • Prepare session materials or practice questions
  • Monitor student progress to discuss with students, parents, or teachers

Tutors work with students one-on-one or in groups to help them learn or to reinforce subject material. For example, they may help students with homework assignments or review worksheets, drills, or other academic exercises. They may create tools and activities, such as educational games, or find resources in textbooks or online.

Tutors structure their lessons based on a variety of factors, including their students’ needs and age. For example, some students may respond well to rapid-response or high-energy activities while other students, such as those with disabilities, may require a slower pace or less sensory stimulation.

Tutors also may help students improve their study and organizational skills. They may help students develop good habits through the use of tools, such as  flash cards, and strategies, including note-taking systems or calendars for managing time.

The following are examples of types of tutors:

Language and ESL tutors assist students who are learning a foreign language or English as a second language (ESL). They may help students develop fluency or literacy by focusing on grammar, pronunciation, reading, and writing in the target language.

Special education tutors work with students who have physical, mental, emotional, or behavioral disabilities. These tutors develop lesson plans and teaching methods based on the specific needs of each student. Special education tutors may help with life skills and social skills in addition to academic subjects.

Subject tutors typically help with homework or other coursework and with reteaching concepts. These tutors typically have a background in the subject that they tutor. For example, a math tutor may have a degree in mathematics or have completed numerous mathematics or related courses.

Test preparation tutors help students prepare for standardized examinations that measure knowledge or skills in a consistent, or “standard,” manner. These tutors may work with students on developing test-taking strategies, such as time management and question analysis, specific to their standardized test.

Work Environment About this section

Tutors
Tutors work in a variety of settings, such as schools and tutoring centers.

Tutors held about 223,700 jobs in 2022. The largest employers of tutors were as follows:

Other schools and instruction; private 28%
Self-employed workers 15
Elementary and secondary schools; local 13
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state 12
Educational support services; state, local, and private 6

Tutors work in a variety of settings, such as schools and tutoring centers. Some tutors travel to students’ homes. 

Work Schedules

Most tutors work part time, and their schedules may vary. For example, they may work evenings and weekends and may have more hours during the school year or leading up to standardized test dates. Because such schedules are common, many of these workers hold other jobs or attend school outside of their tutoring hours.

How to Become a Tutor About this section

Tutors
Tutors must find creative ways to keep students engaged in learning.

Tutors typically need to have completed some college courses, specifically in the subjects that they want to teach. However, education requirements vary. Some employers do not require credentials; others prefer to hire tutors who have a bachelor's degree.  

Education and Training

Tutors typically need to have some college education, specifically in subjects that they want to teach. Some tutors, such as those still in high school, may not have completed college courses but have a strong knowledge or background in a specific subject.

Some employers require that tutors have a bachelor's degree in a field such as education. Other employers may prefer to hire tutors whose degree relates closely to their tutoring subject, such as mathematics or a foreign language.  

Depending on the position, tutors may receive training on the job.

Other Experience

Test preparation tutors usually need to have scored highly on the standardized tests for which they help students prepare. Student tutors, such as those in college, may need a minimum grade point average (GPA) or must have high grades in the subjects that they tutor.

Some employers prefer to hire tutors who have teaching experience or who have a state-issued teaching certification or license.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Tutors must explain concepts in terms that students can understand. They may need to discuss student progress with parents or teachers.

Creativity. Tutors must be able to keep students engaged in learning. They may have to change their methods of instruction to address the needs of different students.

Instructional skills. Tutors must understand the fundamentals of teaching and lesson planning. They must adjust their teaching style and lessons to meet the needs of each student.

Organizational skills. Tutors must coordinate schedules with students, parents, or employers. They must prepare lesson plans and instructional materials for tutoring sessions.

Patience. Working with students of different abilities and backgrounds can be difficult. Tutors must be patient, especially with students who may become distracted or who struggle to master the material.

Pay About this section

Tutors

Median annual wages, May 2022

Total, all occupations

$46,310

Other teachers and instructors

$38,510

Tutors

$36,680

 

The median annual wage for tutors was $36,680 in May 2022. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $26,040, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $73,400.

In May 2022, the median annual wages for tutors in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Elementary and secondary schools; local $45,930
Educational support services; state, local, and private 38,490
Other schools and instruction; private 37,070
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state 32,520

Most tutors work part time, and their schedules may vary. For example, they may work evenings and weekends and may have more hours during the school year or leading up to standardized test dates. 

Job Outlook About this section

Tutors

Percent change in employment, projected 2022-32

Tutors

3%

Total, all occupations

3%

Other teachers and instructors

3%

 

Employment of tutors is projected to grow 3 percent from 2022 to 2032, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

About 39,100 openings for tutors are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

Employment growth for tutors will depend on the size of the student population requiring additional academic assistance. Demand for private tutoring services will continue as students preparing for college strive to differentiate themselves from other applicants through academic achievement. Also, some applicants to graduate school programs will hire tutors to help them prepare for entrance exams. The ability of schools, students, and families to pay for tutoring services will impact future demand for these workers.

Employment projections data for tutors, 2022-32
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2022 Projected Employment, 2032 Change, 2022-32 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Tutors

25-3041 223,700 231,100 3 7,400 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.org. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of tutors.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2022 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Adult literacy and GED teachers Adult Basic and Secondary Education and ESL Teachers

Adult basic and secondary education and ESL (English as a Second Language) teachers instruct adults in fundamental skills, such as reading and speaking English. They also help students earn their high school equivalency credential.

Bachelor's degree $58,590
High school teachers High School Teachers

High school teachers teach academic lessons and various skills that students will need to attend college and to enter the job market.

Bachelor's degree $62,360
Kindergarten and elementary school teachers Kindergarten and Elementary School Teachers

Kindergarten and elementary school teachers instruct young students in basic subjects in order to prepare them for future schooling.

Bachelor's degree $61,620
Middle school teachers Middle School Teachers

Middle school teachers educate students, typically in sixth through eighth grades.

Bachelor's degree $61,810
Postsecondary teachers Postsecondary Teachers

Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a variety of academic subjects beyond the high school level.

See How to Become One $80,840
School and Career Counselors School and Career Counselors and Advisors

School counselors help students develop academic and social skills. Career counselors and advisors help people choose a path to employment.

Master's degree $60,140
Special education teachers Special Education Teachers

Special education teachers work with students who have a wide range of learning, mental, emotional, and physical disabilities.

Bachelor's degree $62,950
Teacher assistants Teacher Assistants

Teacher assistants work with a licensed teacher to give students additional attention and instruction.

Some college, no degree $30,920
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Tutors,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/tutors.htm (visited February 23, 2024).

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 6, 2023

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2022 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2022, the median annual wage for all workers was $46,310.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2022

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2022, which is the base year of the 2022-32 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2022-32

The projected percent change in employment from 2022 to 2032. The average growth rate for all occupations is 3 percent.

Employment Change, 2022-32

The projected numeric change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2022-32

The projected numeric change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2022 to 2032.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2022 to 2032.

2022 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics survey. In May 2022, the median annual wage for all workers was $46,310.