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Social and Community Service Managers

Summary

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Video transcript available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E24m0WUJ-1M.
Quick Facts: Social and Community Service Managers
2019 Median Pay $67,150 per year
$32.28 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation Less than 5 years
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2019 175,500
Job Outlook, 2019-29 17% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2019-29 29,800

What Social and Community Service Managers Do

Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise programs and organizations that support public well-being.

Work Environment

Social and community service managers work for nonprofit organizations, for-profit social service companies, and government agencies. Most work full time.

How to Become a Social and Community Service Manager

Social and community service managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree and work experience.

Pay

The median annual wage for social and community service managers was $67,150 in May 2019.

Job Outlook

Employment of social and community service managers is projected to grow 17 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment growth will be driven by increases in the elderly population and increases in demand for substance abuse treatment and mental health and health-related services.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for social and community service managers.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of social and community service managers with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about social and community service managers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Social and Community Service Managers Do About this section

Social and community service managers
Social and community service managers meet with community members and funding providers to discuss their programs.

Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise programs and organizations that support public well-being. They direct workers who provide these services to the public.

Duties

Social and community service managers typically do the following:

  • Work with community members and other stakeholders to identify necessary programs and services
  • Oversee administrative aspects of programs to meet the objectives of the stakeholders
  • Analyze data to determine the effectiveness of programs
  • Suggest and implement improvements to programs and services
  • Plan and manage outreach activities for increased awareness of programs
  • Write proposals for social services funding

Social and community service managers work for a variety of organizations. Some of these organizations focus on working with a particular demographic, such as children, people who are homeless, older adults, or veterans. Others focus on helping people with particular challenges, such as substance abuse, mental health needs, and chronic hunger.

A routine part of social and community service managers’ job is to show that their programs and services are effective. They collect statistics and other information to evaluate the impact their programs have on the community or their target audience. They are usually required to report this information to administrators or funders. They may also use evaluations to identify opportunities to improve their programs, such as providing mentorship and assessments for their staff.

Although the specific job duties of social and community service managers may vary with the size of the organization, most managers recruit, hire, and train new staff members. They also supervise staff, such as social workers, who provide services directly to clients. Additionally, they may perform some of the services of the workers they oversee.

In large agencies, social and community service managers tend to have specialized duties. They may be responsible for running only one program in an organization and reporting to the agency’s upper management. They usually do not design programs but instead supervise and implement programs set up by administrators, elected officials, or other stakeholders.

In small organizations, social and community managers often have many roles. They represent their organization through public speaking engagements or in communitywide committees; oversee programs and execute their implementations; spend time on administrative tasks, such as managing budgets; and help with raising funds and meeting with potential donors.

Work Environment About this section

social and community service managers image
Social and community service managers work in a variety of settings, including offices, clinics, hospitals, and shelters.

Social and community service managers held about 175,500 jobs in 2019. The largest employers of social and community service managers were as follows:

Individual and family services 29%
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 12
Nursing and residential care facilities 11
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 10
Community and vocational rehabilitation services 9

Social and community service managers work for nonprofit organizations, for-profit social service companies, and government agencies. They also work in a variety of settings, including offices, clinics, hospitals, and shelters.

Work Schedules

Most social and community service managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become a Social and Community Service Manager About this section

Social and community service managers
Social and community service managers typically need at least a bachelor's degree and work experience in a related occupation.

Social and community service managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree and work experience. However, some positions also require a master’s degree.

Education

Social and community service manager jobs typically require a bachelor’s degree in social work, public or business administration, public health, or a related field. However, some positions also require a master’s degree.

Work Experience

Workers usually need experience in order to become a social and community service manager, and it is essential for those with a bachelor’s degree. Candidates can get this experience by working as a social worker, substance abuse counselor, or in a similar occupation.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Social and community service managers need to understand and evaluate data in order to provide strategic guidance to their organization. They must be able to monitor and assess current programs as well as determine new initiatives.

Communication skills. Social and community service managers must be able to speak and write clearly. Public speaking experience is also helpful because these managers often participate in community outreach.

Managerial skills. Social and community service managers spend much of their time administering budgets and responding to a variety of issues.

Problem-solving skills. Social and community service managers must be able to address client, staff, and agency-related issues.

Time-management skills. Social and community service managers must prioritize and handle numerous tasks, often in a short timeframe.

Pay About this section

Social and Community Service Managers

Median annual wages, May 2019

Other management occupations

$91,300

Social and community service managers

$67,150

Total, all occupations

$39,810

 

The median annual wage for social and community service managers was $67,150 in May 2019. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $41,220, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $112,480.

In May 2019, the median annual wages for social and community service managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals $85,550
Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations 70,830
Nursing and residential care facilities 62,020
Individual and family services 61,920
Community and vocational rehabilitation services 60,180

Most social and community service managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

Job Outlook About this section

Social and Community Service Managers

Percent change in employment, projected 2019-29

Social and community service managers

17%

Total, all occupations

4%

Other management occupations

3%

 

Employment of social and community service managers is projected to grow 17 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Much of the job growth in this occupation is the result of an aging population. An increase in the number of older adults will result in a need for more social services, such as adult daycare, creating demand for social and community service managers. Employment of social and community service managers is expected to increase the most in industries serving older adults.

In addition, employment growth is projected as people continue to seek treatment for their addictions and as people with substance abuse disorders are increasingly sent to treatment programs rather than to jail. As a result, managers who direct treatment programs will be needed.

Job Prospects

About 17,100 openings for social and community service managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

Many of those openings are also expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment projections data for social and community service managers, 2019-29
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2019 Projected Employment, 2029 Change, 2019-29 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Social and community service managers

11-9151 175,500 205,400 17 29,800 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)

The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OES data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of social and community service managers.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2019 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Health educators

Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Health educators teach people about behaviors that promote wellness. Community health workers collect data and discuss health concerns with members of specific populations or communities.

See How to Become One $46,910
Mental health counselors and marriage and family therapists

Marriage and Family Therapists

Marriage and family therapists help people manage and overcome problems with family and other relationships.

Master's degree $49,610
Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists

Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists

Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists assist in rehabilitation of law offenders in custody or on probation or parole.

Bachelor's degree $54,290
Rehabilitation counselors

Rehabilitation Counselors

Rehabilitation counselors help people with physical, mental, developmental, or emotional disabilities live independently.

Master's degree $35,950
School and Career Counselors

School and Career Counselors

School counselors help students develop the academic and social skills needed to succeed. Career counselors help people choose a path to employment.

Master's degree $57,040
Social and human service assistants

Social and Human Service Assistants

Social and human service assistants provide client services in a variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, and social work.

High school diploma or equivalent $35,060
Social workers

Social Workers

Social workers help people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives.

See How to Become One $50,470
Substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors

Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors

Substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors provide treatment and advise people who suffer from alcoholism, drug addiction, or other mental or behavioral problems.

Bachelor's degree $46,240
Medical and health services managers

Medical and Health Services Managers

Medical and health services managers plan, direct, and coordinate the business activities of healthcare providers.

Bachelor's degree $100,980
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Social and Community Service Managers,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/social-and-community-service-managers.htm (visited September 01, 2020).

Last Modified Date: Tuesday, September 1, 2020

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2019 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics survey. In May 2019, the median annual wage for all workers was $39,810.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2019

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2019, which is the base year of the 2019-29 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2019-29

The projected percent change in employment from 2019 to 2029. The average growth rate for all occupations is 4 percent.

Employment Change, 2019-29

The projected numeric change in employment from 2019 to 2029.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2019-29

The projected numeric change in employment from 2019 to 2029.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2019 to 2029.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2019 to 2029.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2019 to 2029.

2019 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics survey. In May 2019, the median annual wage for all workers was $39,810.