Asian women and men earned more than their White, Black, and Hispanic counterparts in 2017

August 29, 2018

Asian women and men earned more than their White, Black, and Hispanic counterparts in 2017. Among women, Whites ($795) earned 88 percent as much as Asians ($903); Blacks ($657) earned 73 percent; and Hispanics ($603) earned 67 percent. Among men, these earnings differences were even larger: White men ($971) earned 80 percent as much as Asian men ($1,207); Black men ($710) earned 59 percent as much; and Hispanic men ($690), 57 percent.

Median usual weekly earnings of women and men who are full-time wage and salary workers, by race and Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, 2017
Characteristic Women Men

Total

$770 $941

White

795 971

Black or African American

657 710

Asian

903 1,207

Hispanic or Latino ethnicity

603 690

Earnings differences between women and men were largest among Asians and among Whites. Asian women earned 75 percent as much as Asian men in 2017, and White women earned 82 percent as much as White men. In comparison, Black women had median earnings that were 93 percent of Black men’s, and Hispanic women’s earnings were 87 percent of Hispanic men's.
 
These data are from the Current Population Survey. To learn more, see Highlights of women's earnings in 2017. People whose ethnicity is Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. These earnings comparisons do not control for job skills and responsibilities, work experience, specialization, or other possible causes of earnings differences. The median is the midpoint in the earnings distribution; half of workers earn more than the median and half earn less.

SUGGESTED CITATION

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, Asian women and men earned more than their White, Black, and Hispanic counterparts in 2017 on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2018/asian-women-and-men-earned-more-than-their-white-black-and-hispanic-counterparts-in-2017.htm (visited August 21, 2019).

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