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Administrative Services Managers

Summary

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Quick Facts: Administrative Services Managers
2019 Median Pay $96,940 per year
$46.61 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation Less than 5 years
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2018 300,200
Job Outlook, 2018-28 7% (Faster than average)
Employment Change, 2018-28 21,800

What Administrative Services Managers Do

Administrative services managers plan, direct, and coordinate activities that help an organization run efficiently.

Work Environment

Most administrative services managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week.

How to Become an Administrative Services Manager

Although administrative services managers’ educational requirements vary by organization and the work they do, they usually must have a bachelor’s degree and related work experience.

Pay

The median annual wage for administrative services managers was $96,940 in May 2019.

Job Outlook

Employment of administrative services managers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2018 to 2028, faster than the average for all occupations. Tasks such as managing facilities and preparing for emergencies will remain important in a range of industries.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for administrative services managers.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of administrative services managers with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about administrative services managers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Administrative Services Managers Do About this section

Administrative services managers
Administrative services managers plan, coordinate, and direct a broad range of services that allow organizations to operate efficiently.

Administrative services managers plan, direct, and coordinate activities that help an organization run efficiently. The specific responsibilities vary, but these managers typically maintain facilities and supervise activities that include recordkeeping, mail distribution, and office upkeep. In a small organization, they may direct all support services and may be called the business office manager. Large organizations may have several layers of administrative managers who specialize in different areas.

Duties

Administrative services managers typically do the following:

  • Supervise clerical and administrative staff
  • Set goals and deadlines for their department
  • Develop, manage, and monitor records
  • Recommend changes to policies or procedures in order to improve operations, such as reassessing supplies or recordkeeping
  • Monitor the facility to make sure that it remains safe, secure, and well maintained
  • Oversee the maintenance and repair of machinery, equipment, and electrical and mechanical systems
  • Make sure that facilities meet environmental, health, and security standards and comply with regulations

Administrative services managers plan, coordinate, and direct a broad range of activities that allow organizations to run efficiently. An organization may have several managers who oversee services for multiple departments, such as mail, printing and copying, recordkeeping, security, building maintenance, and recycling.

Specific tasks and responsibilities may vary. For example, an administrative services manager might be responsible for making sure that the organization has the supplies and services it needs. An administrative services manager who coordinates space allocation might consider employee morale and available funds when determining how to arrange a physical space.

Administrative services managers may examine energy consumption patterns, technology use, and office equipment. They also may plan for maintenance and replacement of equipment, such as computers.

The following are examples of types of administrative services managers:

Facility managers oversee buildings, grounds, equipment, and supplies. Their responsibilities cover several categories, including operations, maintenance, and planning and managing projects.

Facility managers may oversee renovation projects to improve efficiency or to meet regulations and environmental, health, and security standards. For example, they may recommend energy-saving alternatives or efficiencies that reduce waste. In addition, they continually monitor the facility to make sure that it remains safe, secure, and well maintained. Facility managers also direct staff, including grounds maintenance workers, janitors and building cleaners, and general maintenance and repair workers.

Records and information managers develop, monitor, and manage an organization’s records. They provide information to chief executives and ensure that employees follow records and information management guidelines. They may direct the operations of onsite or offsite records facilities. These managers also work closely with an organization’s attorneys and its technology and business operations staff. Records and information managers do not handle medical records, which are administered by medical and health services managers.

Work Environment About this section

Administrative services managers
Administrative services managers spend much of their day in an office.

Administrative services managers held about 300,200 jobs in 2018. The largest employers of administrative services managers were as follows:

Healthcare and social assistance 12%
Educational services; state, local, and private 12
Professional, scientific, and technical services 11
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 8
Finance and insurance 8

Administrative services managers spend much of their day in an office. They may observe workers throughout the building, go outdoors to supervise groundskeeping activities, or visit other facilities they direct.

Work Schedules

Most administrative services managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week. Facility managers often are on call to address problems that arise at all hours.

How to Become an Administrative Services Manager About this section

Administrative services managers
In managing workers and coordinating administrative duties, administrative services managers must show leadership ability.

Although educational requirements for administrative services managers vary by organization and the work they do, they usually must have a bachelor’s degree and related work experience.

Education

Administrative services managers typically need a bachelor’s degree, usually in business or a related field. However, some people enter the occupation with a high school diploma.

Work Experience

Administrative services managers must have related work experience that reflects managerial and leadership abilities. Facility managers should have experience in business operations, project management, and building maintenance, such as from jobs as a general maintenance and repair worker or a cost estimator. Records and information managers should have administrative or business operations experience involving recordkeeping. Records and information managers in the legal field often must have experience as a paralegal or legal assistant.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although it is not required, professional certification may give candidates an advantage when applying for jobs.

Several professional associations for administrative services managers offer certifications. Some associations, including the International Facility Management Association (IFMA), offer certification that specializes in facility management. Others offering certification include the Institute of Certified Records Managers (ICRM), for records and information managers, and the ARMA International for those specializing in information governance.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Administrative services managers must be able to review an organization’s procedures for ways to improve efficiency.

Communication skills. Administrative services managers often work with others. They must be able to convey ideas clearly, both orally and in writing.

Detail oriented. Administrative services managers must pay attention to details across a range of tasks, such as ensuring that the organization complies with building codes and managing the process of buying equipment.

Leadership skills. In directing workers and coordinating organizational duties, administrative services managers must be able to motivate employees and handle problems that arise.

Pay About this section

Administrative Services Managers

Median annual wages, May 2019

Operations specialties managers

$120,960

Administrative services managers

$96,940

Total, all occupations

$39,810

 

The median annual wage for administrative services managers was $96,940 in May 2019. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $55,210, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $166,330.

In May 2019, the median annual wages for administrative services managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Finance and insurance $110,170
Professional, scientific, and technical services 106,760
Local government, excluding education and hospitals 93,770
Educational services; state, local, and private 92,270
Healthcare and social assistance 86,960

Most administrative services managers work full time. Some work more than 40 hours per week. Facility managers often are on call to address problems that arise at all hours.

Job Outlook About this section

Administrative Services Managers

Percent change in employment, projected 2018-28

Operations specialties managers

10%

Administrative services managers

7%

Total, all occupations

5%

 

Employment of administrative services managers is projected to grow 7 percent from 2018 to 2028, faster than the average for all occupations. Administrative tasks, including facility management and records and information management, will remain important in a range of industries.

A continuing focus on the environmental impact and energy efficiency of buildings will keep facility managers in demand. Improving energy efficiency can reduce costs and often is required by regulation. For example, building codes typically ensure that buildings meet environmental standards. Facility managers will be needed to oversee these improvements in a wide range of areas, from heating and air-conditioning systems to roofing. In addition, facility managers will be needed to plan for natural disasters, ensuring that any damage to a building will be minimal and that the organization can get back to work quickly.

“Smart building” technology is expected to affect the work of facility managers over the next decade. This technology will provide facility managers with timely and detailed information, such as equipment failure alerts and reminders to do maintenance. This information should allow facility managers to complete their work more efficiently.

Employment of records and information managers also is expected to grow. Demand is expected to be particularly strong for those working in “information governance,” which includes the privacy and legal aspects of records management. As cloud computing and mobile devices become more prevalent, records and information managers will have a critical role in helping organizations develop new records and information management practices and in maintaining data security.

Job Prospects

About 28,100 openings for administrative services managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who exit the labor force, such as to retire, and from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations.

Employment projections data for administrative services managers, 2018-28
Occupational Title SOC Code Employment, 2018 Projected Employment, 2028 Change, 2018-28 Employment by Industry
Percent Numeric

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Administrative services managers

11-3011 300,200 322,000 7 21,800 Get data

State & Area Data About this section

Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)

The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OES data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations About this section

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of administrative services managers.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION Help on Entry-Level Education 2019 MEDIAN PAY Help on Median Pay
Compensation and benefits managers

Compensation and Benefits Managers

Compensation and benefits managers plan, develop, and oversee programs to compensate employees.

Bachelor's degree $122,270
Cost estimators

Cost Estimators

Cost estimators collect and analyze data in order to estimate the time, money, materials, and labor required to make a product or provide a service.

Bachelor's degree $65,250
Human resources managers

Human Resources Managers

Human resources managers plan, direct, and coordinate the administrative functions of an organization.

Bachelor's degree $116,720
Management analysts

Management Analysts

Management analysts propose ways to improve an organization’s efficiency.

Bachelor's degree $85,260
Meeting, convention, and event planners

Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners

Meeting, convention, and event planners coordinate all aspects of events and professional meetings.

Bachelor's degree $50,600
Postsecondary education administrators

Postsecondary Education Administrators

Postsecondary education administrators oversee student services, academics, and faculty research at colleges and universities.

Master's degree $95,410
Property and community association managers

Property, Real Estate, and Community Association Managers

Property, real estate, and community association managers take care of the many aspects of residential, commercial, or industrial properties.

High school diploma or equivalent $58,760
Purchasing managers, buyers, and purchasing agents

Purchasing Managers, Buyers, and Purchasing Agents

Buyers and purchasing agents buy products and services for organizations. Purchasing managers oversee the work of buyers and purchasing agents.

Bachelor's degree $69,600
Top executives

Top Executives

Top executives devise strategies and policies to ensure that an organization meets its goals.

Bachelor's degree $104,690
Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Administrative Services Managers,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/administrative-services-managers.htm (visited May 31, 2020).

Last Modified Date: Friday, April 10, 2020

What They Do

The What They Do tab describes the typical duties and responsibilities of workers in the occupation, including what tools and equipment they use and how closely they are supervised. This tab also covers different types of occupational specialties.

Work Environment

The Work Environment tab includes the number of jobs held in the occupation and describes the workplace, the level of physical activity expected, and typical hours worked. It may also discuss the major industries that employed the occupation. This tab may also describe opportunities for part-time work, the amount and type of travel required, any safety equipment that is used, and the risk of injury that workers may face.

How to Become One

The How to Become One tab describes how to prepare for a job in the occupation. This tab can include information on education, training, work experience, licensing and certification, and important qualities that are required or helpful for entering or working in the occupation.

Pay

The Pay tab describes typical earnings and how workers in the occupation are compensated—annual salaries, hourly wages, commissions, tips, or bonuses. Within every occupation, earnings vary by experience, responsibility, performance, tenure, and geographic area. For most profiles, this tab has a table with wages in the major industries employing the occupation. It does not include pay for self-employed workers, agriculture workers, or workers in private households because these data are not collected by the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) survey, the source of BLS wage data in the OOH.

State & Area Data

The State and Area Data tab provides links to state and area occupational data from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program, state projections data from Projections Central, and occupational information from the Department of Labor's CareerOneStop.

Job Outlook

The Job Outlook tab describes the factors that affect employment growth or decline in the occupation, and in some instances, describes the relationship between the number of job seekers and the number of job openings.

Similar Occupations

The Similar Occupations tab describes occupations that share similar duties, skills, interests, education, or training with the occupation covered in the profile.

Contacts for More Information

The More Information tab provides the Internet addresses of associations, government agencies, unions, and other organizations that can provide additional information on the occupation. This tab also includes links to relevant occupational information from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET).

2019 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics survey. In May 2019, the median annual wage for all workers was $39,810.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

Work experience in a related occupation

Work experience that is commonly considered necessary by employers, or is a commonly accepted substitute for more formal types of training or education.

Number of Jobs, 2018

The employment, or size, of this occupation in 2018, which is the base year of the 2018-28 employment projections.

Job Outlook, 2018-28

The projected percent change in employment from 2018 to 2028. The average growth rate for all occupations is 5 percent.

Employment Change, 2018-28

The projected numeric change in employment from 2018 to 2028.

Entry-level Education

Typical level of education that most workers need to enter this occupation.

On-the-job Training

Additional training needed (postemployment) to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

Employment Change, projected 2018-28

The projected numeric change in employment from 2018 to 2028.

Growth Rate (Projected)

The percent change of employment for each occupation from 2018 to 2028.

Projected Number of New Jobs

The projected numeric change in employment from 2018 to 2028.

Projected Growth Rate

The projected percent change in employment from 2018 to 2028.

2019 Median Pay

The wage at which half of the workers in the occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. Median wage data are from the BLS Occupational Employment Statistics survey. In May 2019, the median annual wage for all workers was $39,810.