Bureau of Labor Statistics

Actors

actors image
Actors interpret a writer's script to entertain or inform an audience.
Quick Facts: Actors
2020 Median Pay $21.88 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Some college, no degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training Long-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 2020 51,600
Job Outlook, 2020-30 32% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2020-30 16,700

Summary

What Actors Do

Actors express ideas and portray characters in theater, film, television, and other performing arts media.

Work Environment

Actors work in various settings, including production studios, theaters, and theme parks, or on location. Work assignments are usually short, ranging from 1 day to a few months.

How to Become an Actor

Many actors enhance their skills through formal dramatic education, and long-term training is common.

Pay

The median hourly wage for actors was $21.88 in May 2020.

Job Outlook

Employment of actors is projected to grow 32 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations.

About 8,200 openings for actors are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for actors.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of actors with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about actors by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Actors Do

Actors
Actors must memorize and rehearse their lines.

Actors express ideas and portray characters in theater, film, television, and other performing arts media. They interpret a writer’s script to entertain or inform an audience.

Duties

Actors typically do the following:

  • Read scripts and meet with agents and other professionals before accepting a role
  • Audition in front of directors, producers, and casting directors
  • Research their character’s personal traits and circumstances to portray the characters more authentically to an audience
  • Memorize their lines
  • Rehearse their lines and performance, including on stage or in front of the camera, with other actors
  • Discuss their role with the director, producer, and other actors to improve the overall performance of the show
  • Perform the role, following the director’s directions

Most actors struggle to find steady work, and few achieve recognition as stars. Some work as “extras”—actors who have no lines to deliver but are included in scenes to give a more realistic setting. Some actors do voiceover or narration work for animated features, audiobooks, or other electronic media.

In some stage or film productions, actors sing, dance, or play a musical instrument. For some roles, an actor must learn a new skill, such as horseback riding or stage fighting.

Most actors have long periods of unemployment between roles and often hold other jobs in order to make a living. Some actors teach acting classes as a second job.

Work Environment

Actors
Some actors wear elaborate makeup and costumes.

Actors held about 51,600 jobs in 2020. The largest employers of actors were as follows:

Self-employed workers 24%
Theater companies and dinner theaters 8
Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private 7
Professional, scientific, and technical services 6

Work assignments are usually short, ranging from 1 day to a few months, and actors often hold another job in order to make a living. They are frequently under the stress of having to find their next job. Some actors in touring companies may be employed for several years.

Actors may perform in unpleasant conditions, such as outdoors in bad weather, under hot stage lights, or while wearing an uncomfortable costume or makeup.

Work Schedules

Work hours for actors are extensive and irregular. Early morning, evening, weekend, and holiday work is common. Some actors work part time. Few actors work full time, and many have variable schedules. Those who work in theater may travel with a touring show across the country. Film and television actors may also travel to work on location.

How to Become an Actor

Actors
Actors may audition for many roles before getting a job.

Many actors enhance their skills through formal dramatic education, and long-term training is common.

Education

Many actors enhance their skills through formal dramatic education. Many who specialize in theater have bachelor’s degrees, but a degree is not required.

Although some people succeed in acting without getting a formal education, most actors acquire some formal preparation through a theater company’s acting conservatory or a university drama or theater arts program. Students can take college classes in drama or filmmaking to prepare for a career as an actor. Classes in dance or music may help as well.

Actors who do not have a college degree may take acting or film classes to learn their craft. Community colleges, acting conservatories, and private film schools typically offer these classes. Many theater companies also have education programs.

Important Qualities

Creativity. Actors interpret their characters’ feelings and motives in order to portray the characters in the most compelling way.

Memorization skills. Actors memorize many lines before filming begins or a show opens. Television actors often appear on camera with little time to memorize scripts, and scripts frequently may be revised or even written just moments before filming.

Persistence. Actors may audition for many roles before getting a job. They must be able to accept rejection and keep going.

Physical stamina. Actors should be in good enough physical condition to endure the heat from stage or studio lights and the weight of heavy costumes or makeup. They may work many hours, including acting in more than one performance a day, and they must do so without getting overly tired.

Reading skills. Actors must read scripts and be able to interpret how a writer has developed their character.

Speaking skills. Actors—particularly stage actors—must say their lines clearly, project their voice, and pronounce words so that audiences understand them.

In addition to these qualities, actors usually must be physically coordinated to perform predetermined, sometimes complex movements with other actors, such as dancing or stage fighting, in order to complete a scene.

Training

It takes many years of practice to develop the skills needed to be a successful actor, and actors never truly finish training. They work to improve their acting skills throughout their career. Many actors continue to train through workshops, rehearsals, or mentoring by a drama coach.

Every role is different, and an actor may need to learn something new for each one. For example, a role may require learning how to sing or dance, or an actor may have to learn to speak with an accent or to play a musical instrument or sport.

Many aspiring actors begin by participating in school plays or local theater productions. In television and film, actors usually start out in smaller roles or independent movies and work their way up to bigger productions.

Advancement

As an actor’s reputation grows, he or she may work on bigger projects or in more prestigious venues. Some actors become producers and directors.

Pay

Actors

Median hourly wages, May 2020

Entertainers and performers, sports and related workers

$22.63

Actors

$21.88

Total, all occupations

$20.17

 

The median hourly wage for actors was $21.88 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $10.51, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $64.92.

In May 2020, the median hourly wages for actors in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Colleges, universities, and professional schools; state, local, and private $22.73
Professional, scientific, and technical services 20.60
Theater companies and dinner theaters 18.61

Work hours for actors are extensive and irregular. Early morning, evening, weekend, and holiday work is common. Some actors work part time. Few actors work full time, and many have variable schedules. Those who work in theater may travel with a touring show across the country. Actors in movies may also travel to work on location.

Job Outlook

Actors

Percent change in employment, projected 2020-30

Actors

32%

Entertainers and performers, sports and related workers

22%

Total, all occupations

8%

 

Employment of actors is projected to grow 32 percent from 2020 to 2030, much faster than the average for all occupations.

About 8,200 openings for actors are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Employment

Much of the projected employment growth in this occupation is due to recovery from the COVID-19 recession that began in 2020 and is likely to occur early in the decade.

While many theaters and production companies stopped performances during the COVID-19 pandemic, demand for actors is expected to recover as these establishments resume operations.

Streaming services and other online-only platforms are expected to drive employment demand for actors as the number of shows produced and the volume of content increases.

However, many small and medium-sized theaters often have difficulty funding operations. As a result, the number of performances is expected to decline, which may impact employment of actors in these establishments. Large theaters, with more stable sources of funding and well-known plays and musicals, may be less susceptible to fluctuations in employment demand.

Employment projections data for actors, 2020-30

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Occupational Title

Actors

SOC Code27-2011
Employment, 202051,600
Projected Employment, 203068,300
Percent Change, 2020-3032
Numeric Change, 2020-3016,700
Employment by IndustryGet data

State & Area Data

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OES data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of actors.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY
Radio and television announcers Announcers

Announcers present music, news, and sports and may provide commentary or interview guests.

See How to Become One $41,950
Dancers and choreographers Dancers and Choreographers

Dancers and choreographers use dance performances to express ideas and stories.

See How to Become One The annual wage is not available.
Film and video editors and camera operators Film and Video Editors and Camera Operators

Film and video editors and camera operators manipulate moving images that entertain or inform an audience.

Bachelor's degree $61,900
Multimedia artists and animators Special Effects Artists and Animators

Special effects artists and animators create images that appear to move and visual effects for various forms of media and entertainment.

Bachelor's degree $77,700
Musicians and singers Musicians and Singers

Musicians and singers play instruments or sing for live audiences and in recording studios.

No formal educational credential The annual wage is not available.
Producers and directors Producers and Directors

Producers and directors create motion pictures, television shows, live theater, commercials, and other performing arts productions.

Bachelor's degree $76,400

Contacts for More Info

Last Modified Date: Wednesday, September 8, 2021

Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Actors,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/entertainment-and-sports/actors.htm (visited October 06, 2021).

Telephone: 1-202-691-5700 www.bls.gov/ooh Contact OOH

View this page on regular www.bls.gov

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