Bureau of Labor Statistics

Gambling Services Workers

gaming services occupations image
Many gaming services workers are employed by casinos.
Quick Facts: Gambling Services Workers
2020 Median Pay $27,050 per year
$13.01 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education High school diploma or equivalent
Work Experience in a Related Occupation See How to Become One
On-the-job Training See How to Become One
Number of Jobs, 2019 187,300
Job Outlook, 2019-29 10% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2019-29 19,000

Summary

What Gambling Services Workers Do

Gambling services workers serve customers in gambling establishments, such as casinos or racetracks.

Work Environment

Most gambling services workers are employed in gambling industries. Because most of these establishments are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, employees often work nights, weekends, and holidays. Most work full time, although part-time work is common.

How to Become a Gambling Services Worker

Gambling jobs typically require a high school diploma or equivalent to enter. Some employers require gambling managers to have a college degree. In addition, all gambling services workers must have excellent customer-service skills.

Pay

The median annual wage for gaming services workers was $27,050 in May 2020.

Job Outlook

Employment of gambling services workers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment will be driven by the increasing popularity of gambling establishments.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for gambling services workers.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of gambling services workers with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about gambling services workers by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Gambling Services Workers Do

Gaming services occupations
Many gambling dealers specialize in one type of game.

Gambling services workers serve customers in gambling establishments, such as casinos or racetracks. Some workers tend slot machines or deal cards. Others take bets or pay out winnings. Still others supervise or manage gambling workers and operations.

Duties

Gambling services workers typically do the following:

  • Interact with customers and make sure that they have a pleasant experience
  • Monitor customers for violations of gambling rules or the establishment’s policies
  • Inform their supervisor or a security employee of any irregularities they see
  • Enforce safety rules and report hazards
  • Explain to customers how to play the games

The following are examples of types of gambling services workers:

First-line supervisors of gambling services workers directly monitor and coordinate the activities of workers in assigned gambling areas. They move within their assigned areas make sure that everything is running smoothly and that all areas are properly staffed. Table games supervisors (also called floor supervisors) oversee gambling dealers, table games, and players. Slot supervisors oversee activities of the slot department.

Gambling and sports book writers and runners handle bets on sporting events and take and record bets for customers. In addition, they help run games such as bingo and keno. They verify tickets and pay out winning tickets, and some runners collect winning tickets from customers.

Gambling dealers operate table games such as blackjack, craps, and roulette. They control the pace and action of the game, announcing each player’s move to the rest of the table and letting players know when it is their turn. They inspect cards or dice, pay off winning bets, and collect on winning bets. Dealers are often required to work at least two games, usually blackjack or craps.

Gambling managers, who also may be casino managers, plan, coordinate, or direct operations in a gambling establishment. They may create house rules, such as for betting limits, and address customer complaints about service. Gambling managers also hire and train new employees.

For information on gambling cage workers, see the profile on financial clerks. For information on gambling surveillance officers and gambling investigators, see the profile on security guards and gambling surveillance officers.

Work Environment

Gaming services occupations
Slot supervisors are in charge of the slot department.

Gaming services workers held about 187,300 jobs in 2019. Employment in the detailed occupations that make up gaming services workers was distributed as follows:

Gambling dealers 102,900
First-line supervisors of gambling services workers 58,000
Gambling service workers, all other 10,900
Gambling and sports book writers and runners 10,400
Gambling managers 5,100

The largest employers of gaming services workers were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals 25%
Self-employed workers 17
Spectator sports 4

Gambling dealers spend most of their shift standing or sitting behind a table. Although managers and supervisors may spend limited time working in an office, they frequently monitor activities by circulating among areas on the floor of the establishment.

Casinos in some states are exempt from laws prohibiting smoking indoors. The atmosphere in these facilities may expose gambling services workers to hazards such as secondhand smoke from cigarettes, cigars, or pipes.

Noise from slot machines, gambling tables, and loud customers may be distracting, although workers may wear protective headgear in areas where machinery is used to count money.

Work Schedules

Most casinos are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Employees are often scheduled to work nights, weekends, and holidays, which are typically the busiest times for casinos. Most work full time, although part-time work is common.

How to Become a Gambling Services Worker

Gaming services occupations
Dealers should have good customer-service skills.

Gambling jobs typically require a high school diploma or equivalent to enter. Some employers require gambling managers to have a college degree.

Education

Gambling dealers, gambling supervisors, and gambling and sports book writers and runners typically need a high school diploma or equivalent. Educational requirements for gambling managers differ by establishment. Some require a high school diploma or equivalent, while others require gambling managers to have some college or a degree. Those who pursue a degree may choose to study casino management, hotel management, or hospitality, in addition to taking courses in business.

Training

Individual casinos or other gambling establishments have their own training requirements. New gambling dealers may be sent to gambling school for a few weeks to learn a table game, such as blackjack or craps. These schools teach the game’s rules and procedures, as well as state and local laws and regulations related to it.

Although gambling school is primarily for new employees, some experienced dealers go to gambling school if they want to be trained in a new game.

Completing gambling school before being hired may increase a prospective dealer’s chances of being hired, but it does not guarantee a job. Employers usually audition prospective dealers for open positions to assess their personal qualities.

Gambling and sports book writers and runners usually do not have to go to gambling school. They typically are trained in less than 1 month. The employer provides instruction on state and local laws and regulations related to the game, as well the particulars of their job, such as keno calling.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Gambling services workers must be licensed by a state regulatory agency, such as a state casino control board or gambling commission. Licensing requirements for supervisory or managerial positions may differ from those for gambling dealers, gambling and sports book writers and runners, and all other gambling workers. However, all candidates for a license must provide photo identification and pay a fee. Typically, they also must pass an extensive background check and drug test. Failure to pass the background check may prevent candidates from getting a job or a gambling license.

Age requirements also vary by state. For specific licensing requirements, visit the state’s gambling commission website.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Gambling supervisors and gambling managers usually have several years of experience working in a casino or other gambling establishment. Gambling managers often have experience as a dealer or in the customer outreach department. Slot supervisors and table games supervisors usually have experience working in the activities of their respective areas. Some also have worked in entry-level marketing or customer-service positions.

Advancement

Often, gambling managers are promoted from positions as slot supervisors or table games supervisors. They also may be moved from a management job in another part of the establishment, such as hospitality, after learning about the establishment’s operations through an internship or on-the-job training.

Gambling dealers may advance to become gambling supervisors and, eventually, managers. A slot supervisor or table games supervisor may also advance to become a gambling manager.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Gambling services workers must explain the rules of the game to customers and answer their questions. Misunderstandings can cost a customer money and damage the establishment’s reputation.

Customer-service skills. Gambling jobs involve interaction with customers. The success or failure of a gambling establishment depends on how customers view the experience, making customer service important for all of these occupations.

Leadership skills. Gambling managers and supervisors oversee other gambling services workers and must guide them in doing their jobs and developing their skills.

Math skills. Because they may deal with large amounts of money, gambling services workers must be good at math.

Organizational skills. Gambling managers and supervisors should have an orderly system in place to handle administrative and other tasks for overseeing gambling services workers.

Patience. All gambling services workers must stay composed when they encounter a customer who becomes upset or breaks a rule. They also must stay calm when dealing with equipment failures or malfunctions.

Pay

Gambling Services Workers

Median annual wages, May 2020

Total, all occupations

$41,950

Gaming services workers

$27,050

Entertainment attendants and related workers

$24,980

 

The median annual wage for gambling services workers was $27,050 in May 2020. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $17,740, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $58,070.

Median annual wages for gambling services workers in May 2020 were as follows:

Gambling managers $75,470
First-line supervisors of gambling services workers 50,440
Gambling service workers, all other 29,360
Gambling and sports book writers and runners 25,220
Gambling dealers 23,740

In May 2020, the median annual wages for gaming services workers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals $28,100
Spectator sports 27,060

Most casinos are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Employees are often scheduled to work nights, weekends, and holidays, which are typically the busiest times for casinos. Most work full time, although part-time work is common.

Job Outlook

Gambling Services Workers

Percent change in employment, projected 2019-29

Gaming services workers

10%

Entertainment attendants and related workers

8%

Total, all occupations

4%

 

Employment of gambling services workers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2019 to 2029, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will vary by detailed occupation (see table). However, because gambling managers is a small occupation, the fast growth will result in only about 500 new jobs over the decade.

Employment will be driven by the increasing popularity of gambling establishments. Additional states currently without commercial gambling establishments may allow new casinos to be built over the next decade in an effort to bring in more tax revenue.

As more states approve expansions in the number of gambling establishments, the competition for customers will increase. Establishments that fail to keep or attract customers may close, thereby negating some of the jobs created.

Job Prospects

About 30,000 openings for gambling services workers are projected each year, on average, over the decade.

Many of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

Those who already have a gambling license and knowledge and training in different casino games should have the best job prospects.

Employment projections data for gambling services workers, 2019-29

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program

Occupational Title

Gaming services workers

SOC Code
Employment, 2019187,300
Projected Employment, 2029206,300
Percent Change, 2019-2910
Numeric Change, 2019-2919,000
Employment by Industry
Occupational Title

Gambling managers

SOC Code11-9071
Employment, 20195,100
Projected Employment, 20295,600
Percent Change, 2019-299
Numeric Change, 2019-29500
Employment by IndustryGet data
Occupational Title

First-line supervisors of gambling services workers

SOC Code39-1013
Employment, 201958,000
Projected Employment, 202967,500
Percent Change, 2019-2916
Numeric Change, 2019-299,500
Employment by IndustryGet data
Occupational Title

Gambling dealers

SOC Code39-3011
Employment, 2019102,900
Projected Employment, 2029110,700
Percent Change, 2019-298
Numeric Change, 2019-297,900
Employment by IndustryGet data
Occupational Title

Gambling and sports book writers and runners

SOC Code39-3012
Employment, 201910,400
Projected Employment, 202910,800
Percent Change, 2019-294
Numeric Change, 2019-29400
Employment by IndustryGet data
Occupational Title

Gambling service workers, all other

SOC Code39-3019
Employment, 201910,900
Projected Employment, 202911,600
Percent Change, 2019-297
Numeric Change, 2019-29700
Employment by IndustryGet data

State & Area Data

Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS)

The Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program produces employment and wage estimates annually for over 800 occupations. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. The link(s) below go to OEWS data maps for employment and wages by state and area.

Projections Central

Occupational employment projections are developed for all states by Labor Market Information (LMI) or individual state Employment Projections offices. All state projections data are available at www.projectionscentral.com. Information on this site allows projected employment growth for an occupation to be compared among states or to be compared within one state. In addition, states may produce projections for areas; there are links to each state’s websites where these data may be retrieved.

CareerOneStop

CareerOneStop includes hundreds of occupational profiles with data available by state and metro area. There are links in the left-hand side menu to compare occupational employment by state and occupational wages by local area or metro area. There is also a salary info tool to search for wages by zip code.

Similar Occupations

This table shows a list of occupations with job duties that are similar to those of gambling services workers.

Occupation Job Duties ENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION 2020 MEDIAN PAY
Customer service representatives

Customer Service Representatives

Customer service representatives interact with customers to handle complaints, process orders, and answer questions.

High school diploma or equivalent $35,830
Lodging managers

Lodging Managers

Lodging managers ensure that traveling guests have a pleasant experience at their establishment with accommodations. They also ensure that the business is run efficiently and profitably.

High school diploma or equivalent $56,670
Public relations managers and specialists

Public Relations and Fundraising Managers

Public relations managers direct the creation of materials that will enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization.

Bachelor's degree $118,430
public relations specialists image

Public Relations Specialists

Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent.

Bachelor's degree $62,810
Retail sales workers

Retail Sales Workers

Retail sales workers help customers find products they want and process customers’ payments.

No formal educational credential $27,320
Sales managers

Sales Managers

Sales managers direct organizations' sales teams.

Bachelor's degree $132,290
Security guards and gaming surveillance officers

Security Guards and Gambling Surveillance Officers

Security guards and gambling surveillance officers protect property from illegal activity.

High school diploma or equivalent $31,080
Financial clerks

Financial Clerks

Financial clerks do administrative work, help customers, and carry out transactions that involve money.

High school diploma or equivalent $41,520

Contacts for More Info

Last Modified Date: Thursday, April 29, 2021

Suggested citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Gambling Services Workers,
at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/gaming-services-occupations.htm (visited May 27, 2021).

Telephone: 1-202-691-5700 www.bls.gov/ooh Contact OOH

View this page on regular www.bls.gov

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